Jane Addams Peace Association News

YA author Katherine Paterson dishes on upcoming film adaptation

“I’ve known for a long time how intensely children feel - I was a child,” Paterson told me when we talked recently. “People tell me: ‘Why don’t you write for real people?’ which infuriates me, because children are real people.”

“I really think [the movie] is coming out at a wonderful time, because it’s a time of a polarized country - we’re so filled with hate and unhappiness of all sides, all points of the spectrum-and this is a story about truly caring across a lot of lines,” she said.

“It’s about how truly caring [adults] can do so much for a lost child who is so angry. But in some ways, our country is that lost child, lashing out at everyone.”

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The Same Stuff as Stars by Katherine Paterson 2003 Awardee

The Great Gilly Hopkins by Katherine Paterson 1979 Awardee


Author Jacqueline Woodson to visit North Andover

The Stevens Memorial Library teamed up with North Andover schools to host an author series all month, which will culminate in the visit of renowned author Jacqueline Woodson on Monday Nov. 28.

“We’ve taken one of Jacqueline Woodson’s books, mounted the pages on placards…so if you walk around you can read the book,” said Stevens Memorial Library director Kathleen Keenan of one of the story walks located outside the library.

The walks are located at the triangle lawn in front of the Stevens Memorial Library and at the First and Main Marketplace, where the pages are located in shop windows. There are three books to read on-the-go.

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When asked about why she writes, she has said “I can’t write about nice, easy topics because that won’t change the world. And I do want to change the world-one reader at a time.” … “Diversity is about all of us, and about us having to figure out how to walk through this world together.”

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Each Kindness written by Jacqueline Woodson, illustrated by E.B. Lewis 2013 Awardee

From the Notebooks of Melanin Sun by Jacqueline Woodson 1996 Awardee

I Hadn’t Meant to Tell You This by Jacqueline Woodson 1995 Awardee


In 'Preaching To The Chickens,’ Rep. John Lewis’ Childhood In Full Color

Rep. John Lewis, a Democrat from Georgia, has long been a powerful voice for the civil rights movement. He was one of the leaders of the 1965 march from Selma to Montgomery and made a keynote address during the March on Washington.

But where did Lewis’ voice and activism come from? That’s the subject of Jabari Asim’s new book for children, “Preaching to the Chickens: The Story of Young John Lewis,” illustrated by E. B. Lewis.

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Each Kindness written by Jacqueline Woodson, illustrated by E.B. Lewis 2013 Awardee

Night Boat to Freedom, written by Margot Theis Raven with pictures by E. B. Lewis 2007 Awardee

Since 1953, the Jane Addams Children’s Book Award annually acknowledges books published in the U.S. during the previous year. Books commended by the Award address themes of topics that engage children in thinking about peace, justice, world community and/or equality of the sexes and all races. The books also must meet conventional standards of literacy and artistic excellence.

A national committee chooses winners and honor books for younger and older children.

Click here to read more about the 2016 Awards.

Author Edwidge Danticat speaks at Hope College, tells immigrant story

Danticat spoke before a full house Tuesday evening at Hope College’s Dimnent Chapel, the climactic event in a month of Big Read events centered on her book, “Brother, I’m Dying.”

Danticat used Haitian folk tales to illustrate points in her narrative. Another Haitian proverb ? “Sometimes you’re running from the rain and you end up in the fire” ? describes the “sacrifice” and “mixed bag” of immigration, she said.

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Mama’s Nightingale: A Story of Immigration and Separation by Edwidge Danticat 2016 Awardee


Children’s Literature and Human Rights

Raab Illustration Prize and Human Rights Exhibition Project: An exhibition of works from the Northeast Children’s Literature Collection depicting a selection of inalienable rights of children: education, food, health, participation, safety and shelter.

Read More and more here


The Rooster Who Would Not Be Quiet! Publishers Weekly Review

Deedy uses repeating language to powerful effect, ramping up the stakes while underscoring the gallito’s steady determination. “And if you have no more corn?” asks Don Pepe, threatening the rooster with starvation. “I may sing a hungrier song,” answers the bird. “But I will still sing.”

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The Yellow Star: The Legend of King Christian X of Denmark written by Carmen Agra Deedy 2001 Awardee


Access Atlanta Author events, Nov. 20-26

Carole Boston Weatherford and R. Gregory Christie, “Freedom in Congo Square.” 3 p.m. Nov. 20. Talk, signing. Free. Auburn Avenue Research Library, 101 Auburn Ave. N.E., Atlanta. 404-730-4001, Ext. 100; afpls.org/events-aarl. Author Weatherford and illustrator Christie’s children’s book explores the lives of enslaved Africans in 19th-century New Orleans who congregated on Sundays to set up an open market, sing, dance and play music. Original art from the book will be on display in the library’s Children’s Gallery.

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Birmingham, 1963 by Carole Boston Weatherford 2008 Awardee

The Book Itch: Freedom, Truth & Harlem’s Greatest Bookstore by Vaunda Micheaux Nelson, illustrated by R. Gregory Christie 2016 Awardee

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Since 1953, the Jane Addams Children’s Book Award annually acknowledges books published in the U.S. during the previous year. Books commended by the Award address themes of topics that engage children in thinking about peace, justice, world community and/or equality of the sexes and all races. The books also must meet conventional standards of literacy and artistic excellence.

A national committee chooses winners and honor books for younger and older children.

Read more about the 2016 Awards.

Hundreds Of Children’s Book Authors Pledge To Combat Bigotry

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This week, hundreds of children’s book authors and illustrators signed a pledge to use their art to fight bigotry and to make young readers feel safe and accepted. The pledge includes Jacqueline Woodson, Carole Boston Weatherford, Linda Sue Park, Vanessa Brantley-Newton, Mitali Perkins, Kathryn Erskine, Jewell Parker Rhodes, Margarita Engle, Amy Lee-Tai, Cynthia Levinson and many, many more.

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Cobb artist named a top children’s book illustrator by New York Times

The New York Times honored a Cobb County artist in its “Best Illustrated Children’s Books of 2016” competition.

The award was for illustrations by R. Gregory Christie, of Mableton, in “Freedom in Congo Square” by Carole Boston Weatherford.

The book chronicles 19th-century slaves in New Orleans counting down the week until Sunday when they could congregate in Congo Square to socialize and play music.

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The Book Itch: Freedom, Truth & Harlem’s Greatest Bookstore by Vaunda Micheaux Nelson, illustrated by R. Gregory Christie 2016 Awardee


‘I saw an author!’ Author/illustrator Tonatiuh visits school

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Students at two local elementary schools were wide-eyed and all ears, like the highly stylized figures in Duncan Tonatiuh’s children’s books. The author and illustrator came to speak with them recently.

“I saw an author!” one boy exclaimed after the presentation, as if he’d spotted a unicorn.

The look of Tonatiuh’s characters was inspired by the ancient Mexican art of the Mixtec culture. It’s part of how he honors the past while speaking to a wider audience in the present.

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Separate is Never Equal: Sylvia Mendez and her family’s fight for desegregation, written and illustrated by Duncan Tonatiuh 2015 Awardee


13 YA Novels By Latino Authors Everyone Needs To Read

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The Lightning Dreamer: Cuba’s Greatest Abolitionist by Margarita Engle

Merging several genres into this lyrical book for young readers, Margarita Engle uses poetry, historical fiction, and nonfiction to tell the story of Cuban feminist and abolitionist Gertrudis Gmez de Avellaneda, one of nineteenth century Cuba’s youngest opponents to slavery. After refusing an arranged marriage at only 14 years old, Gmez de Avellaneda then used her newfound freedom to write poetry that stood up against Cuba’s injustices.

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Esperanza Rising by Pam Muoz Ryan

Growing up on her family’s ranch in Mexico, Esperanza Ortega had everything she could ever want - beautiful clothes, servants, a home fit for a princess. But when her father dies Esperanza and her mother lose everything, and are forced to immigrate to the United States to rebuild their lives. They arrive to an America in the middle of the Great Depression, and begin working in a camp for Mexican farm laborers - an environment nothing like the one Esperanza grew up in. But through it all Esperanza adapts, overcomes, and rises.

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Silver People: Voices from the Panama Canal by Margarita Engle 2015 Awardee

The Surrender Tree: Poems of Cuba’s Struggle for Freedom, written by Margarita Engle 2009 Awardee

Esperanza Rising written by Pam Munoz Ryan 2001 Awardee


Author to talk about 'Stubby the War Dog’

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“Stubby and His Favorite Doughboy” is the title of author Ann Bausum’s presentation at the Gays Mills community room at 7 p.m, Tuesday, Nov. 15.

Wisconsin author Ann Bausum wrote “Stubby the War Dog” for children and “Sergeant Stubby” for adults.

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Marching to the Mountaintop: How Poverty, Labor Fights and Civil Rights Set the Stage for Martin Luther King Jr’s Final Hours, written by Ann Bausum 2013 Awardee

With Courage and Cloth: Winning the Fight for a Woman’s Right to Vote, by Ann Bausum 2005 Awardee


It waves for what just happened, and what lies ahead

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FAITH RINGGOLD, the artist and equal-rights activist and author, may reflect on the election during her appearance Saturday at the Art Museum of Sonoma County.

Ringgold, 86, is known for her story quilts, paintings and books, among them the Caldecott Medal-winning “Tar Beach,” the story of an 8-year-old girl who sets out a towel on a Harlem rooftop and dreams of being completely free.

Ringgold will speak about her life and work starting at 5 p.m. at the Santa Rosa museum, currently home to the exhibit, “Faith Ringgold: An American Artist.” There are details at sonomacountymuseum.org.

A New Jersey resident and professor emeritus at UC San Diego, the artist-activist has said, “Although I love a beautiful vase of flowers, a sumptuous landscape or a sunset, I will not be moved to paint one of these without a meaningful personal reference that is also political.”

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Aunt Harriet’s Underground Railroad in the Sky by Faith Ringgold 1993 Awardee


Some Review! Adam Gopnik on an E.B. White Biography for Kids

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An illustrated book for children about a writer who wrote children’s books with illustrations seems an oddly special and self-enclosed genre, but “Some Writer!,” Melissa Sweet’s book about the life and work of E.B. White, is still a pretty good one. Despite a title that feels a bit too coyly obvious - mirroring, as it does, the most famous line in White’s book “Charlotte’s Web,” where Charlotte the spider writes “Some Pig!” in her web to promote the doomed Wilbur - “Some Writer!” certainly will fulfill kids’ natural curiosity about the author of a “classic” that, unusual thing, still really works for them.

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Brave Girl: Clara and the Shirtwaist Makers’ Strike of 1909, written by Michelle Markel and illustrated by Melissa Sweet 2014 Awardee


A tale of two endings: Karen Blumenthal updates her Hillary Clinton bio for January release

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With the paperback edition of her young adult book, Hillary Rodham Clinton, being issued in January by Square Fish, the paperback imprint of Macmillan Children’s, she had the unique opportunity to write about Clinton’s victory or her defeat.

“Had she won, I would have written more about the people who came to be with her on Election Day and how they celebrated, how she prepared for the next steps and what she said in her speech.

"Since she didn’t win, I had to explain why, which is complicated after describing and quoting Donald Drumpf in the general election chapter, titled Nasty.”

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Let Me Play: The Story of Title IX, the Law that Changed the Future of Girls in America, by Karen Blumenthal 2006 Awardee


Bookworms: True stories, more or less, with pictures

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“Radiant Child: The Story of Young Artist Jean-Michel Basquiat” by Javaka Steptoe. (Ages 4 to 8. Little, Brown Books for Young Readers.)

Vibrantly colored, humming with energy, Javaka Steptoe’s paintings evoke the style of Jean-Michel Basquiat. In this sensitive biography of the '80s art sensation, Steptoe lets those bold paintings hint at the emotional turmoil of Basquiat’s short life, concentrating on the childhood influences that steered his growth into an artist. A car accident, museum visits, the vitality of New York City and his mother’s mental illness all come together in Basquiat’s art, paintings that are “not neat or clean and definitely not inside the lines, but somehow still beautiful.” Steptoe’s book is true to the jarring, original, exciting feeling of Basquiat’s art and life ? but it stops just before the sad, abrupt end of Basquiat’s own story with a drug overdose at age 27.

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Hot Day on Abbott Avenue by Karen English, with collage art of Javaka Steptoe 2005 Awardee


Reading to Children in the Age of Trump

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As a former kindergarten and first grade teacher, I have read hundreds of children’s books. One of the best stories I’ve encountered for discussing issues of racism, discrimination, and bullying with young children is Mr. Lincoln’s Way by award-winning author and illustrator Patricia Polacco.

Mr. Lincoln’s Way provides parents looking to discuss Trump’s victory a conversation starter or talking piece. This engaging story about redemption and hope invites children to think deeply about difference and bullying, while simultaneously cultivating empathy and understanding for others. Together, readers discover that Eugene possesses a unique skill that transforms the school’s atrium and his relation with his teachers and the other students in his class.

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Mrs. Katz and Tush by Patricia Polacco 1993 Awardee

Since 1953, the Jane Addams Children’s Book Award annually acknowledges books published in the U.S. during the previous year. Books commended by the Award address themes of topics that engage children in thinking about peace, justice, world community and/or equality of the sexes and all races. The books also must meet conventional standards of literacy and artistic excellence.

A national committee chooses winners and honor books for younger and older children.

Click here to read more about the 2016 Awards.

A Mexican-American artist on why more brown faces are needed in children’s books

“I am both Mexican and American … and what I’ve discovered is that despite the apparent differences between these two countries - the buildings, the food, the day-to-day routines, physical appearances, the politics - at the end of the day, we are more similar than different,” he wrote in an author’s note in one of his books. “People are people,” he said.

PBS NewsHour spoke with the award-winning author on how he chose his style, what children have said about his work, and why there ought to be more brown faces in children’s books.

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Separate is Never Equal: Sylvia Mendez and her family’s fight for desegregation, written and illustrated by Duncan Tonatiuh 2015 Awardee


Chris Crowe And Current Race Issues In Utah And America On Tuesday’s Access Utah

BYU English Professor, Chris Crowe, is an award-winning author of books for young adults about the Civil Rights era. His nonfiction book, GETTING AWAY WITH MURDER: THE TRUE STORY OF THE EMMETT TILL CASE, was an Jane Addams Honor book.

His first children’s book, JUST AS GOOD: HOW LARRY DOBY CHANGED AMERICA’S GAME, appeared in 2012. His newest book, a historical novel DEATH COMING UP THE HILL, is about the tumultuous year of 1968.

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Getting Away with Murder: The True Story of the Emmett Till Case by Chris Crowe 2004 Awardee


Lois Lowry talks about inspirational writers, new memoir

The Daily Texan spoke with Lowry about her influences and new memoir “Looking Back: A Book of Memories” before the Texas Book Festival this weekend.

“In my young years, there was a book called ‘The Yearling’ by Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings, which my mother read to me when I was probably eight. That changed my literate life, hearing that book read to me by my mother, who I adored. I went back after she finished it and read it to myself and I re-read it many times.”

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Number the Stars written by Lois Lowry 1990 Awardee


Get your reading glasses on, Sharjah book fair starts today

Thousands of book lovers, authors, publishers and prominent local and international personalities will descend on Sharjah today for the opening day of the book fair.

This year’s event - which is being held under the theme of “Read More” - will see the participation of 1,420 publishing houses drawn from 60 countries, with over 1.5 million books on display throughout the 11-day event.

A number of guests will be coming from as far afield as the UK and the US, including Palestinian-American poet, songwriter and novelist, Naomi Shihab Nye.

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Habibi written by Naomi Shihab Nye 1998 Awardee

Sitti’s Secrets written by Naomi Shihab Nye 1995 Awardee


If You Plant a Seed By Amy Blake [Behind Paywall]

In general, people learn through their experiences. Many of those experiences are what they see around them, on TV and by what they read.

“If You Plant a Seed,” by Kadir Nelson grabbed my attention last spring, first because of the title and, after reading it, because of the story. This particular book is about a rabbit and mouse who plant a garden. Through their hard work, love and care (think weeding), the garden grew and the two animals were jumping with joy. While eating some of their delicious fresh vegetables, several birds flew down and stared at them rudely. Could they eat some of their bounty?

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Heart and Soul: The Story of America and African Americans written and illustrated by Kadir Nelson 2012 Awardee

The Village That Vanished written by Ann Grifalconi and illustrated by Kadir Nelson 2003 Awardee


Don’t miss these authors at the St. Louis Jewish Book Festival

Jan. 15 with Cynthia Levinson, author of “Watch Out for Flying Kids!”

For more details, including individual prices, go to stljewishbookfestival.org.

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We’ve Got a Job: The 1963 Birmingham Children’s March written by Cynthia Levinson 2013 Awardee


Author Edwidge Danticat to Deliver Keynote Address on Nov. 15

Edwidge Danticat, whose book “Brother, I’m Dying” is the focus of the community-wide Big Read Holland Area this year, will deliver the program’s keynote address on Tuesday, Nov. 15, at 7 p.m. in Dimnent Memorial Chapel at Hope College.

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Mama’s Nightingale: A Story of Immigration and Separation by Edwidge Danticat 2016 Awardee


Throwback Thursday: Walter Dean Myers

Walter Dean Myers has had the type of career that most authors can only dream of. Since becoming first published in 1969, Myers has won five Coretta Scott King Awards, two Newbery Honors, and was awarded the first American Library Association Michael L. Printz Award for Monster.

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Patrol: An American Soldier in Vietnam written by Walter Dean Myers 2003 Awardee

Now Is Your Time! The African-American Struggle for Freedom written by Walter Dean Myers 1992 Awardee

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Since 1953, the Jane Addams Children’s Book Award annually acknowledges books published in the U.S. during the previous year. Books commended by the Award address themes of topics that engage children in thinking about peace, justice, world community and/or equality of the sexes and all races. The books also must meet conventional standards of literacy and artistic excellence.

A national committee chooses winners and honor books for younger and older children.

Read more about the 2016 Awards.

Authors Hail Booksellers at 2016 SCIBA

“You have superpowers,” a tearful Towers Falling author Jewell Parker Rhodes told the booksellers. “One book at a time, you are changing the world.”

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Sugar by Jewell Parker Rhodes 2014 Awardee

The Ninth Ward by Jewell Parker Rhodes 2011 Awardee

Children’s Illustrator Visits Newtown Elementary School

Children’s book illustrator Shane Evans visited Newtown Elementary School last week.

He ended his presentation singing and playing the guitar to a song from one of his books that he wrote and illustrated titled, “Olu’s Dream.”

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Lillian’s Right to Vote: A Celebration of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 by Jonah Winter, illustrated by Shane W. Evans 2016 Awardee

We March written and illustrated by Shane W. Evans 2013 Awardee

National Book Award- winning children’s author to read at Sweet Briar

Award-winning novelist Kathryn Erskine has written about a lot of topics, but there is one theme that unites them all: hope.

“That’s really why I write,” she says. “There are always people around who will help you, always a reason to keep trying, so don’t give up!”

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Seeing Red by Kathryn Erskine 2014 Awardee

From Migrant Child to University Professor

Francisco Jimnez, author of critically acclaimed memoir series, to receive UCSB’s annual Luis Leal Literature Award

Jimnez’s collection of autobiographical short stories, “The Circuit: Stories from the Life of a Migrant Child” (University of New Mexico Press, 1997) has won several literary awards, including a Booklist Editors’ Choice; the Boston Globe Horn Book Award for Fiction; the Americas Award; the California Library Association John and Patricia Beatty Award; a Jane Addams Honor Book Award; an American Library Association Best Book for Young Adults; the FOCAL Award given by the Los Angeles Public Library System; and the University of San Francisco’s Reading the World Award.

Jimnez is the recipient of numerous honors, including, most recently, the 2016 John Steinbeck Award, which is presented to artists and activists whose work exemplifies the spirit of Steinbeck’s social engagement.

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The Circuit: Stories from the Life of a Migrant Child by Francisco Jimnez 1998 Awardee

Patricia McKissack receives 2016 Tradition of Literary Excellence Award

Patricia McKissack is the recipient of the 2016 Tradition of Literary Excellence Award. The award, which is funded by the Municipal Commission of Arts & Letters of University City, is given “to honor the work of a living local author whose literary achievement has won national and international acclaim and, in so doing, has contributed to the distinction of the St. Louis area.” In partnership with her late husband Frederick McKissack, she wrote more than 100 children’s books.

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A Long Hard Journey: The Story of the Pullman Porter written by Patricia and Fredrick McKissack 1990 Awardee

Did You Know: Subaru Awards the Best Children’s Science Books Every Year

Every year, the AAAS and Subaru team up to celebrate outstanding science writing and illustration books for children and young adults.

2016 Middle Grades Science Book: The Octopus Scientists: Exploring the Mind of a Mollusk by Sy Montgomery.

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Temple Grandin: How the Girl Who Loved Cows Embraced Autism and Changed the World by Sy Montgomery 2013 Awardee

‘One Author, One Community’ coming to Stevens Memorial Library

Stevens Memorial Library and the North Andover Public Schools are sponsoring the One Author, One Community series this fall. Nationally recognized author and poet Jacqueline Woodson is the featured author.

Our goal is to foster a sense of community by bringing people together through the promotion of literacy and intergenerational discussions. Our “One Author” this year, Jacqueline Woodson, is the winner of the National Book Award and Newberry Honor for her young-adult memoir Brown Girl Dreaming.

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From the Notebooks of Melanin Sun by Jacqueline Woodson 1996 Awardee

I Hadn’t Meant to Tell You This by Jacqueline Woodson 1995 Awardee

Each Kindness written by Jacqueline Woodson, illustrated by E.B. Lewis 2013 Awardee

Author to speak about engaging youth

Andrea Pinkney will deliver a lecture titled “Mirrors, Windows, Doors-and More!” The lecture will seek to shed light on the process by which books for young people are written and illustrated.

Over the course of her celebrated career, Pinkney has committed herself to improving the quality and increasing the breadth of literature available to Black children of all ages.

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Sit-In: How Four Friends Stood Up by Sitting Down by Andrea Davis Pinkney, illustrated by Brian Pinkney 2011 Awardee

Sojourner Truth’s Step-Stomp Stride, by Andrea Davis Pinkney & Brian Pinkney 2010 Awardee

Benny Andrews: The Bicentennial Series

To coincide with the presidential election, Michael Rosenfeld Gallery presents Benny Andrews: The Bicentennial Series - the gallery’s second solo exhibition featuring the work of Benny Andrews (American, 1930-2006). This exhibition will consist of paintings and drawings from all six individual subseries - Symbols, Trash, Circle, Sexism, War and Utopia - which in their totality comprise The Bicentennial Series.

Completed between 1970 to 1975, The Bicentennial Series was conceived to reveal one Black Americans view of the United States at a time when the country was celebrating a milestone and feeling nostalgic. Fearing that black Americans would be invisible from all Bicentennial narratives and celebrations, Benny Andrews devoted himself to sharing his “feelings and impressions of this place-America.”

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Delivering Justice: W. W. Law and the Fight for Civil Rights, written by Jim Haskins illustrated by Benny Andrews 2006 Awardee

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Since 1953, the Jane Addams Children’s Book Award annually acknowledges books published in the U.S. during the previous year. Books commended by the Award address themes of topics that engage children in thinking about peace, justice, world community and/or equality of the sexes and all races. The books also must meet conventional standards of literacy and artistic excellence.

A national committee chooses winners and honor books for younger and older children.

Read more about the 2016 Awards.



© 2016 Jane Addams Peace Association

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