Jane Addams Peace Association News

11 Children’s Books That Teach The Importance Of Understanding Privilege

  • ‘Henry’s Freedom Box: A True Story From The Underground Railroad’ by Ellen Levine, Illus. by Kadir Nelson
  • 'Separate Is Never Equal: Sylvia Mendez and Her Family’s Fight for Desegregation’ by Duncan Tonatiuh
  • 'Chocolate Me!’ by Taye Diggs, Illus. by Shane W. Evans
  • 'Sit-In: How Four Friends Stood Up by Sitting Down’ by Andrea Davis Pinkney, Illus. by Brian Pinkney

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The Village That Vanished written by Ann Grifalconi and illustrated by Kadir Nelson 2003 Awardee

Heart and Soul: The Story of America and African Americans written and illustrated by Kadir Nelson 2012 Awardee

Darkness over Denmark: The Danish Resistance and the Rescue of the Jews written by Ellen Levine 2001 Awardee

Freedom’s Children: Young Civil Rights Activists Tell Their Stories written by Ellen Levine 1994 Awardee

Separate is Never Equal: Sylvia Mendez and her family’s fight for desegregation, written and illustrated by Duncan Tonatiuh 2015 Awardee

Lillian’s Right to Vote: A Celebration of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 by Jonah Winter, illustrated by Shane W. Evans 2016 Awardee

We March written and illustrated by Shane W. Evans 2013 Awardee

Sit-In: How Four Friends Stood Up by Sitting Down by Andrea Davis Pinkney, illustrated by Brian Pinkney 2011 Awardee

Sojourner Truth’s Step-Stomp Stride, by Andrea Davis Pinkney & Brian Pinkney 2010 Awardee


Naomi Shihab Nye: Poetry/Fiction/Creative Nonfiction Reading

For the Ransom Center’s 2016 Burnshaw Lecture series, poet and MCW visiting professor Naomi Shihab Nye will give a reading of her work.
Event Date and Time: September 29, 2016, 7:00 PM

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Habibi written by Naomi Shihab Nye 1998 Awardee


Young author beats hundreds to win national writing prize

Elsie Leiper, aged 12, from Hemel Hempstead. Winner of the Henrietta Branford Writing Competition for young writers, 2016.

Elsie attended the Branford Boase Award celebration party in London last week and was awarded her prize by Carnegie Medal-winning author Beverley Naidoo.

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Talented teen comes first in writing contest

Jessica Woods came top in the 2016 Henrietta Branford Writing Competition, an annual event for young people that aims to find and encourage writers of the future.

The Wakefield Girls’ High School student was awarded her prize by Carnegie Medal-winning author Beverley Naidoo at the Branford Boase Award celebration party in London last week.

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Out of Bounds: Seven Stories of Conflict and Hope, written by Beverley Naidoo 2004 Awardee

The Other Side of Truth written by Beverley Naidoo 2002 Awardee


2016 Oswego Writing Institute Features Award-Winning Authors

The 2016 Oswego Writing Institute will benefit the Literacy Coalition of Oswego County August 16-17. The Institute will be at the SUNY Oswego Campus Center from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. each day and feature keynote presentations by authors Carole Boston Weatherford and Gary D. Schmidt.

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Birmingham, 1963 by Carole Boston Weatherford 2008 Awardee

Since 1953, the Jane Addams Children’s Book Award annually acknowledges books published in the U.S. during the previous year. Books commended by the Award address themes of topics that engage children in thinking about peace, justice, world community and/or equality of the sexes and all races. The books also must meet conventional standards of literacy and artistic excellence.

A national committee chooses winners and honor books for younger and older children.

Click here to read more about the 2016 Awards.

Christopher Myers and Random House Partner for New Imprint

Inspired by his passion for bringing diversity to children’s literature ? a mission shared by his late father, acclaimed author Walter Dean Myers ? author and artist Christopher Myers is launching a new imprint called Make Me a World with Random House Children’s Books.

“It partially had to do with some op-ed pieces that my father and I wrote in 2014 and published in the New York Times about the need for stories to be told that had been neglected. No one will disagree that there is a need for diversity in children’s literature, and a need to respond to the changing demographics of our country and our world. But at the same time, as we look at the statistics, those books are not being published.”

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Now Is Your Time! The African-American Struggle for Freedom written by Walter Dean Myers 1992 Awardee

Patrol: An American Soldier in Vietnam written by Walter Dean Myers 2003 Awardee


Get the Picture! focuses on art in new children’s books

The exhibition “Get the Picture! Contemporary Children’s Art” is being held through Oct. 9 at the Brandywine River Museum of Art, Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania. The exhibition is truly contemporary since it includes only works done in the last five years, and all eight illustrators have won major awards. Publicity material from the museum promotes inclusiveness, which, among other things, means they include male, female, African American and Latino artists.

For exhibition curator H. Nichols B. Clark, Bryan Collier ? an African American artist who grew up on Maryland’s Eastern Shore ? provides a role model. Clark selected collages from Collier ? accompanying Langston Hughes’ “I, Too, Am America” ? showing a caring Pullman porter, who collects unwanted magazines and newspapers from passengers to help African Americans living near the tracks learn how to read.

Also featured, Melissa Sweet’s fantastical, talking and heroic pencils.

Illustrator Melissa Sweet and author Jen Bryant will talk about collaboration 6-8 p.m. Aug. 10, with a book signing and reception following.

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Martin’s Big Words: The Life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. written by Doreen Rappaport with artwork by Bryan Collier 2002 Awardee

Brave Girl: Clara and the Shirtwaist Makers’ Strike of 1909, written by Michelle Markel and illustrated by Melissa Sweet 2014 Awardee


‘New Yorker’ Cover Artist Kadir Nelson on Police Killings: “These Young Men Are Real People”

The L.A.-based painter says his painting of an African-American dad and his three kids “provides counterpoint to a lot of what’s going on in the country right now.”

“… the cover provides counterpoint to a lot of what’s going on in the country right now that we’re being bombarded with ? these very unnecessary and tragic, heartbreaking experiences. I’m at a loss for words. These young men are losing their lives unnecessarily. In this day and age for this kind of thing to still be happening is heartbreaking. These are real people who have real families. Not only are they affected by what’s going on, but all of us have to bear witness to it and we get to see a lot of it through social media immediately. A lot of us have cameras and can share what’s going on right away. It’s unfortunate and heartbreaking.”

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Heart and Soul: The Story of America and African Americans written and illustrated by Kadir Nelson 2012 Awardee

The Village That Vanished written by Ann Grifalconi and illustrated by Kadir Nelson 2003 Awardee

Since 1953, the Jane Addams Children’s Book Award annually acknowledges books published in the U.S. during the previous year. Books commended by the Award address themes of topics that engage children in thinking about peace, justice, world community and/or equality of the sexes and all races. The books also must meet conventional standards of literacy and artistic excellence.

A national committee chooses winners and honor books for younger and older children.

Click here to read more about the 2016 Awards.

Artist Kadir Nelson’s illustrations of pride and soul

Kadir Nelson is an artist unknown to many. But you’ll find his work on magazines, albums, posters and postage stamps. Then there are the children’s books - more than two dozen of them. Ben Tracy meets the illustrator who counts Norman Rockwell and N.C. Wyeth among his influences - and who explains what happens when his paintbrush starts to sing.

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KADIR NELSON’S “A DAY AT THE BEACH”

“I grew up close to the shore, and I have always loved spending time at the beach,” the Los Angeles-based artist Kadir Nelson says of his cover for this week’s issue.

“When I was young it meant time with my dad, and now that I’m a father myself I relish the long summer days spent with my own children.”

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Heart and Soul: The Story of America and African Americans written and illustrated by Kadir Nelson 2012 Awardee

The Village That Vanished written by Ann Grifalconi and illustrated by Kadir Nelson 2003 Awardee


Mazza Summer Conference features children’s authors

From July 18 to 22, the University of Findlay will host the Mazza Summer Conference featuring speakers: Chris Barton, Rosemary Wells, Barney Saltzberg, Marie-Louise Gay, Lizzy Rockwell, Steve Light, Lita Judge, Elly MacKay, Randall de Sve, Steve Swinburne, Jim Averbeck, and Jason Chin.

Lita is the author and illustrator for over twenty fiction and nonfiction picture books including Hoot and Peep (Dial, 2016), Born in the Wild (Roaring Brook, 2014), Flight School (Simon & Schuster, 2014) and Red Sled (S&S, 2011). Her books have received numerous awards including the Jane Addams Honor, ALA Notable, Texas 22, the International Literacy Association Children’s Book Award. Her book Flight School is now an Off-Broadway musical for children at the Vital Theater in New York City.

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One Thousand Tracings: Healing the Wounds of World War II by Lita Judge 2008 Awardee


Mother and son collaborate on tribute to Tuskegee Airmen

Carole Boston Weatherford, a professor of English at Fayetteville State University, tells the tale of the Tuskegee Airmen through poetry in her latest book, “You Can Fly.” Her son, Jeffery Boston Weatherford, illustrated the 80-page volume. This is their first published collaboration.

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Birmingham, 1963 by Carole Boston Weatherford 2008 Awardee


COMING SOON! Another Brooklyn

Jacqueline Woodson’s Another Brooklyn heartbreakingly illuminates the formative period when a child meets adulthood?when precious innocence meets the all-too-real perils of growing up. In prose exquisite and lyrical, sensuous and tender, Woodson breathes life into memories, portraying an indelible friendship that united young lives.

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Each Kindness written by Jacqueline Woodson 2013 Awardee

From the Notebooks of Melanin Sun by Jacqueline Woodson 1996 Awardee

I Hadn’t Meant to Tell You This by Jacqueline Woodson 1995 Awardee

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Since 1953, the Jane Addams Children’s Book Award annually acknowledges books published in the U.S. during the previous year. Books commended by the Award address themes of topics that engage children in thinking about peace, justice, world community and/or equality of the sexes and all races. The books also must meet conventional standards of literacy and artistic excellence.

A national committee chooses winners and honor books for younger and older children.

Read more about the 2016 Awards.

Z for Zachariah: a complex exploration of power and gender

Jenny Downham explains how Robert C O?Brien?s novel of post-nuclear apocalypse gave her far more than relief from the fear of nuclear war in the 1970s ? a life-long belief in the strength of girls and women, and the prototype for her own fictional heroines

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Z for Zachariah by Robert C. O'Brien 1976 Awardee


Arna Bontemps summer camp keeps kids engaged in the arts

For some children, their stories will begin with fun, lasting memories from the 2016 summer enrichment camp, ?E?levate, Lift Ev?ry Voice,“ sponsored by the Arna Bontemps African-American Museum and Cultural Arts Center.

Students who have displayed an interest in the arts were nominated by their school teachers to be part of the camp, where they have been given the opportunity to celebrate and learn more about the rich diversity of the arts which are embedded in Louisiana’s culture.

The Arna Bontemps Summer Enrichment camp is supported by a grant from the Louisiana Division of the Arts, Office of Cultural Development, Department of Culture, Recreation, and Tourism, in cooperation with the Louisiana State Arts Council, as administered by the Arts Council of Central Louisiana. Funding has also been provided by the National Endowment for the Arts, Art Works.

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Story of the Negro written by Arna Bontemps 1956 Awardee


First look at some of the authors headed to the Texas Book Festival

The first names from Texas Book Festival?s schedule were unveiled Tuesday at an event in Dallas. Among them:

Jacqueline Woodson, National Book Award winner for Brown Girl Dreaming. Her first adult novel in 20 years, Another Brooklyn, will be released in August.

The National Book Award-winning author of Brown Girl Dreaming and more than a dozen books for young adults, middle grade and young readers now presents a new novel for adults. Set in 1970s Brooklyn, Another Brooklyn tells the story of a friendship between two young women coming of age as the city around them changed. Ann Patchett, bookseller and author of Bel Canto, describes it as, ??.a moving meditation on girlhood, love, loss, hurt, friendship, family, faith, longing, and desire.?

Newbery Medal winner Lois Lowry (Number the Stars, The Giver).

We?re honored to welcome Lois Lowry, legendary author of The Giver quartet, with a new and updated edition of her memoir. Lowry?s influence has been felt by generations of young readers who have read and discussed The Giver. Her memoir shares personal photos and memories from the life of one of our most celebrated writers.

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Each Kindness by Jacqueline Woodson 2013 Awardee

I Hadn’t Meant to Tell You This by Jacqueline Woodson 1995 Awardee

From the Notebooks of Melanin Sun by Jacqueline Woodson 1996 Awardee

Number the Stars by Lois Lowry 1990 Awardee


Choctaw Nation to Share Culture in Nation?s Capital

On June 24 and 25 the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma will team up with the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian to present the 2016 Choctaw Nation Arts & Music Festival at the Potomac Atrium in Washington, D.C. Tim Tingle will share tales of Choctaw heritage.

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Crossing Bok Chitto: told in written form by nationally recognized Choctaw storyteller, Tim Tingle 2007 Awardee


Oregon author shines a light on one man’s determination to educate black children

Oregon children’s author Deborah Hopkinson has long brought history to life for young readers, introducing them to events.

In Hopkinson’s new picture book, "Steamboat School”, she shines a light on one of her most inspirational subjects yet: a slave who bought his freedom, became a minister and, in the 1840s, opened a school in Missouri for free black children. “Steamboat School,” featuring lyrical text by Hopkinson and poignant illustrations by Ron Husband, is told through the eyes of a fictional student who attends the school with his sister.

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Girl Wonder: A Baseball Story in Nine Innings by Deborah Hopkinson 2004 Awardee

Shutting Out the Sky: Life in the Tenements of New York 1880-1924 by Deborah Hopkinson 2004 Awardee

A Band of Angels: A Story Inspired written by the Jubilee Singers by Deborah Hopkinson 2000 Awardee

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Since 1953, the Jane Addams Children?s Book Award annually acknowledges books published in the U.S. during the previous year. Books commended by the Award address themes of topics that engage children in thinking about peace, justice, world community and/or equality of the sexes and all races. The books also must meet conventional standards of literacy and artistic excellence.

A national committee chooses winners and honor books for younger and older children.

Read more about the 2016 Awards.

GKIDS, Angelina Jolie-Pitt bringing ‘Breadwinner’ to North American theaters in 2017

GKIDS is producing, financing and distributing The Breadwinner, which is an adaptation of the young-adult novel by Deborah Ellis. New York-based animation distributor GKIDS announces that CEO/Founder Eric Beckman and SVP of Distribution David Jesteadt will executive produce - along with Angelina Jolie Pitt and others - The Breadwinner, the latest feature from two-time Oscar nominated studio Cartoon Saloon. The screenplay is co-written by Anita Doron and Deborah Ellis.

Based on the internationally acclaimed children’s novel by Deborah Ellis, ?The Breadwinner’ tells the story of Parwana, a 12 year old girl growing up in Afghanistan in 2001. When her father is arrested, Parwana dresses as a boy in order to work and provide for her family. Together with her best friend Shauzia, she risks discovery to try to find out if her father is still alive.

A story of self-empowerment and imagination in the face of oppression, The Breadwinner also celebrates the culture, history and beauty of Afghanistan.

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The Heaven Shop by Deborah Ellis 2005 Awardee

The Breadwinner Trilogy by Deborah Ellis 2004 Awardee

Parvana’s Journey by Deborah Ellis 2003 Awardee


Pam Muoz Ryan Wins Children’s History Book Prize

Author Pam Muoz Ryan received New-York Historical Society’s 2016 Children’s History Book Prize for Echo (Scholastic, 2015).

The theme of standing up to prejudice and injustice and how these struggles are intertwined in the lives of these children from different geographic, cultural, and ethnic backgrounds resonated with our educator, historian, and student jurors.

The novel, which already won a Newbery Honor earlier this year, is a blend of historical fiction and magical realism, about children connected across decades and continents by a mysterious harmonica.

With Echo, Muoz Ryan is continuing to inspire children to engage with difficult topics like intolerance and injustice.

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Esperanza Rising by Pam Muoz Ryan 2001 Awardee


Op-ed: When I met Muhammad Ali in the Tabernacle by Phillip Hoose

One Sunday morning in 1997, I met Muhammad Ali at the Mormon Tabernacle in Salt Lake City… When I reached Ali, I thanked him for refusing to be drafted into the Vietnam War. I extended my hand but rather than shake it, Ali slipped a piece of paper into it and winked.

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Claudette Colvin by Phillip Hoose 2010 Awardee

Hey, Little Ant written by Phillip and Hannah Hoose 1999 Awardee


Prolific Author Proves Power of Word

Students prepared for Woodson’s visit, coordinated by Kent District Library as part of the KDL Reads program, by using the book as inspiration for writing poetry and essays of their own for the high-school Aspiring Writers Contest.

Woodson also visited Wyoming High School, where juniors prepared by publishing a book of their own prose. Godwin Heights Middle and High School students also participated in Literary Lunches to study “Brown Girl Dreaming.”

Woodson has visited many schools across the country, but Godwin Heights and Wyoming were her last planned visits. She said she enjoys meeting teenagers.

“They’re open and honest and hungry and looking for ways to represent themselves in the world,” she said.

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Each Kindness written by Jacqueline Woodson, illustrated by E.B. Lewis 2013 Awardee

From the Notebooks of Melanin Sun by Jacqueline Woodson 1996 Awardee

I Hadn’t Meant to Tell You This by Jacqueline Woodson 1995 Awardee


Q & A with Emily Arnold McCully

Q: How do you research your books, and is there a time period you’ve especially enjoyed looking into?

A: I prefer to research my stories with actual books…

I am most at home in the 18th and 19th centuries, but have researched medieval China (Beautiful Warrior) and closed off Japan (Manjiro). My mission is often to recover forgotten or little known girls and women who made significant contributions to the human story.

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New York City Children’s Theater Celebrates 20th Anniversary Season

Break out the tutus and toe-shoes for Sophie the Swan’s latest adventure. A companion piece to the hit BALLERINA SWAN, this world premiere blends ballet and puppetry as Sophie prepares for her first holiday performance of “The Nutcracker.” Based on the book BALLERINA SWAN by Allegra Kent and illustrated by Emily Arnold McCully.

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The Escape of Oney Judge: Martha Washington’s Slave Finds Freedom written and illustrated by Emily Arnold McCully 2008 Awardee


Teaching Tuskegee Airmen’s story [Behind Pay Wall]

In “You Can Fly: The Tuskegee Airmen,” Carole Boston Weatherford writes about the historic African-American civilian pilot training program during World War II and the men who were the “Red Tails” and broke barriers as well as cemented their place in military, aviation and U.S. history.

Weatherford is an award-winning, best-selling author who teaches at Fayetteville State University and the book’s illustrator is her son, Jeffery Boston Weatherford. The Weatherfords will visit The Regulator Bookshop on June 15 to discuss their new book. A small hardcover that could easily fit in a backpack for middle grade readers ages 9 through 12, “You Can Fly” presents the Tuskegee Airmen’s story in a series of poems and black and white illustrations.

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Birmingham, 1963 by Carole Boston Weatherford 2008 Awardee


A Word In Edgewise: Keep Reinventing that Wheel

Trouble in Mind recently closed its triumphant run at the Guthrie (Mpls, MN). Splendidly acted and directed, Alice Childress’ 1955 drama centers around a young, white director (John Catron) rehearsing a mostly black cast of actors through the clichd Southern drama, Chaos in Belleville.

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A Hero Ain’t Nothin’ But A Sandwich by Alice Childress 1974 Awardee


Lion Island: Cuba’s Warrior of Words by Margarita Engle | SLJ Review

Engle transports readers to the world of 1870s Cuba, where Chinese indentured laborers struggle for freedom in a complex atmosphere of rebellion and injustice. This little- known and fascinating historical moment prompts Engle’s characters to consider privilege and equity from many different angles.

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Silver People: Voices from the Panama Canal by Margarita Engle 2015 Awardee

The Surrender Tree: Poems of Cuba’s Struggle for Freedom by Margarita Engle 2009 Awardee


2nd Annual Samantha Smith Challenge

Giving meaning to education. That’s what organizers say the Samantha Smith Challenge does for area middle-schoolers.

The late Samantha Smith was a Maine middle school student who inspired a dialogue of peace between the US and Soviet Union during the Cold War, after writing a letter to Yuri Andropov.

More than 400 students honored her legacy by presenting their community service projects to the public.

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Journey to the Soviet Union written by Samantha Smith 1986 Awardee

Since 1953, the Jane Addams Children’s Book Award annually acknowledges books published in the U.S. during the previous year. Books commended by the Award address themes of topics that engage children in thinking about peace, justice, world community and/or equality of the sexes and all races. The books also must meet conventional standards of literacy and artistic excellence.

A national committee chooses winners and honor books for younger and older children.

Click here to read more about the 2016 Awards.



© 2016 Jane Addams Peace Association

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