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Association for Library Service to Children (ALSC) names 2017 Notable Children’s Books

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“Rudas: Nino’s Horrendous Hermanitas.” By Yuyi Morales. Illus. by the author. Roaring Brook/Neal Porter.

“Thunder Boy Jr.” By Sherman Alexie. Illus. by Yuyi Morales. Little, Brown.

“I Dissent: Ruth Bader Ginsburg Makes Her Mark.” By Debbie Levy. Illus. by Elizabeth Baddeley. Simon & Schuster.

“A Poem for Peter: The Story of Ezra Jack Keats and the Creation of The Snowy Day.” By Andrea Davis Pinkney. Illus. by Lou Fancher and Steve Johnson. Viking.

“Preaching to the Chickens: The Story of Young John Lewis.” By Jabari Asim. Illus. by E. B. Lewis. Penguin/Nancy Paulsen.

“The Princess and the Warrior: A Tale of Two Volcanoes.” By Duncan Tonatiuh. Illus. by the author. Abrams.

“Steamboat School.” By Deborah Hopkinson. Illus. by Ron Husband. Disney/Jump at the Sun.

“We Will Not Be Silent: The White Rose Student Resistance Movement That Defied Adolf Hitler.” By Russell Freedman. illus. Clarion.

“You Can Fly: The Tuskegee Airmen.” By Carole Boston Weatherford. Illus. by Jeffery Boston Weatherford. Atheneum.

“Freedom in Congo Square.” By Carole Boston Weatherford. Illus. by R. Gregory Christie. little bee.

“Olinguito, de la A a la Z! / Olinguito, from A to Z! Descubriendo el bosque nublado / Unveiling the Cloud Forest.” By Lulu Delacre. Illus. by the author. Lee & Low.

“Radiant Child: The Story of Young Artist Jean-Michel Basquiat.” By Javaka Steptoe. Illus. by the author. Little, Brown.

“Some Writer! The Story of E. B. White.” By Melissa Sweet. Illus. by the author. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.

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Harvesting Hope: The Story of Cesar Chavez, written by Kathleen Krull, illustrated by Yuyi Morales 2004 Awardee

We Shall Overcome: The Story of a Song written by Debbie Levy and illustrated by Vanessa Brantley-Newton 2014 Awardee

Sit-In: How Four Friends Stood Up by Sitting Down by Andrea Davis Pinkney, illustrated by Brian Pinkney 2011 Awardee

Sojourner Truth’s Step-Stomp Stride, by Andrea Davis Pinkney & Brian Pinkney 2010 Awardee

Each Kindness written by Jacqueline Woodson, illustrated by E.B. Lewis 2013 Awardee

Night Boat to Freedom, written by Margot Theis Raven with pictures by E. B. Lewis 2007 Awardee

Separate is Never Equal: Sylvia Mendez and her family’s fight for desegregation, written and illustrated by Duncan Tonatiuh 2015 Awardee

Girl Wonder: A Baseball Story in Nine Innings by Deborah Hopkinson, illustrated by Terry Wideners, 2004 Awardee

Shutting Out the Sky: Life in the Tenements of New York 1880-1924 by Deborah Hopkinson 2004 Awardee

A Band of Angels: A Story Inspired written by the Jubilee Singers by Deborah Hopkinson, illustrated by Ral Coln, 2000 Awardee

Freedom Walkers, written by Russell Freedman 2007 Awardee

Kids at Work: Lewis Hine and the Crusade Against Child Labor written by Russell Freedman 1995 Awardee

Eleanor Roosevelt: A Life of Discovery written by Russell Freedman 1994 Awardee

Birmingham, 1963 by Carole Boston Weatherford 2008 Awardee

The Book Itch: Freedom, Truth & Harlem’s Greatest Bookstore by Vaunda Micheaux Nelson, illustrated by R. Gregory Christie 2016 Awardee

The Storyteller’s Candle/La velita de los cuentos, Story by Cuento Luca Gonzlez, Illustrations/Illustraciones Lulu Delacre 2009 Awardee

Hot Day on Abbott Avenue by Karen English, with collage art of Javaka Steptoe 2005 Awardee

Brave Girl: Clara and the Shirtwaist Makers’ Strike of 1909, written by Michelle Markel and illustrated by Melissa Sweet 2014 Awardee


Reading to Remember

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The Legendary Miss Lena Horne
Written by Carole Boston Weatherford and illustrated by Elizabeth Zunon
The Legendary Miss Lena Horne introduces young readers to one of the underappreciated heroes of the civil rights movement.

Frederick Douglass: The Lion Who Wrote History
Written by Walter Dean Myers and illustrated by Floyd Cooper
Frederick Douglass is one of the most well-known figures in African-American history. In Frederick Douglass: The Lion Who Wrote History, the late author Walter Dean Myers tells the story of how the former slave became educated and fought his way to freedom before dedicating his life to doing the same for others.

The Youngest Marcher
Written by Cynthia Levinson and illustrated by Vanessa Brantley Newton
It’s not always easy to stand up for what is right, but it’s even harder as a kid. Audrey Faye Hendricks did just that as a 9-year-old in Birmingham, Alabama.

Fancy Party Gowns: The Story of Fashion Designer Ann Cole Lowe
Written by Deborah Blumenthal and illustrated by Laura Freeman
Ann Cole Lowe faced many obstacles on her quest to achieve her dreams. Some have called the talented African-American fashion designer “society’s best-kept secret.” While she is known for designing the dress that Jacqueline Kennedy wore at her wedding to future president John F. Kennedy in 1953, most of Lowe’s beautiful creations didn’t get much recognition during her lifetime.

Let’s Clap, Jump, Sing & Shout; Dance, Spin & Turn It Out!
Written by Patricia C. McKissack and illustrated by Brian Pinkney
Have you ever wondered about the origin of your favorite songs or games? In Patricia McKissack’s newest book, Let’s Clap, Jump, Sing & Shout; Dance, Spin & Turn It Out!: Games, Songs & Stories from an African-American Childhood, she explains the origin of her childhood favorites.

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Birmingham, 1963 by Carole Boston Weatherford 2008 Awardee

Now Is Your Time! The African-American Struggle for Freedom written by Walter Dean Myers 1992 Awardee

Patrol: An American Soldier in Vietnam written by Walter Dean Myers 2003 Awardee

Ruth and the Green Book by Calvin Alexander Ramsey with Gwen Strauss and illustrated by Floyd Cooper 2011 Awardee

We’ve Got a Job: The 1963 Birmingham Children’s March written by Cynthia Levinson 2013 Awardee

We Shall Overcome: The Story of a Song written by Debbie Levy and illustrated by Vanessa Brantley-Newton 2014 Awardee

Let Me Play: The Story of Title IX, the Law that Changed the Future of Girls in America by Karen Blumenthal 2006 Awardee

A Long Hard Journey: The Story of the Pullman Porter written by Patricia and Fredrick McKissack 1990 Awardee

Sit-In: How Four Friends Stood Up by Sitting Down by Andrea Davis Pinkney, illustrated by Brian Pinkney 2011 Awardee

Sojourner Truth’s Step-Stomp Stride, by Andrea Davis Pinkney & Brian Pinkney 2010 Awardee


Here are the books you need to read if you’re going to resist Donald Trump

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Forewarned is forearmed, as one of the novel’s folksy characters might say.

In the Heart of the Valley of Love, by Cynthia Kadohata
In the place of expectations about the world, which can breed complacency when those expectations are met and despair when they are not, the novel suggests it is possible to find power in imagining better alternatives to the present.

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Weedflower by Cynthia Kadohata 2007 Awardee


Black Girl Magic! 12 Year Old To Publish Her Own Book

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12-YEAR-old Marley Dias is working on her own book about activism and social justice. The youngster, who’s hashtag #1000BlackGirlBooks is part of her mission to collect stories about women of colour, will publish her book with Scholastic, and is scheduled for a 2018 release.

“Marley’s energy and passion are electric!” said Andrea Davis Pinkney, vice president and executive editor of Scholastic. “Through her smarts and ingenuity, she’s delivered a jolt of inspiration that’s sent an unstoppable shock-wave to kids everywhere who’ve stood up with Marley to shout ‘Yes!’ to the power of positive action.”

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Sit-In: How Four Friends Stood Up by Sitting Down by Andrea Davis Pinkney, illustrated by Brian Pinkney 2011 Awardee

Sojourner Truth’s Step-Stomp Stride, by Andrea Davis Pinkney & Brian Pinkney 2010 Awardee


The creation story of the atomic bomb told through a powerful and moving picture book

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“I had seen some of the interior art and text at that point, and I was intrigued by the way the tone of both Jeanette Winter’s illustrations and her son Jonah Winter’s text so thoroughly conveyed the almost frenzied, kinetic energy of the inventors and the eerily quiet secrecy of the The Secret Project. After reading the book, I realized that I had greatly underestimated the importance of the telling in its entirety, which is done so masterfully by the Winters.”

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Nasreen’s Secret School: A True Story from Afghanistan, written and illustrated by Jeanette Winter 2010 Awardee

Lillian’s Right to Vote: A Celebration of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 by Jonah Winte 2016 Awardee


Kindness is the key as Hampton students celebrate Black History Month

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A favorite project of Wyland Elementary third-grade art teacher Kate Powell is the creation of a large fabric and paper quilt inspired by the children’s novel “Tar Beach,” written by African-American artist Faith Ringgold.

The book centers around a young girl who lives in the city but dreams she can fly and about the places she would go. The character made quilts that demonstrated her dreams for herself and for the world, said Powell.

“I think they really understood the idea each one of us is capable of actions in making it a better world,” said Powell.

Koble said her students identified with the book’s character who is also 8 years old, like many of them. Koble stresses that she tries to incorporate lessons celebrating differences throughout the year, not just during Black History Month.

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Aunt Harriet’s Underground Railroad in the Sky by Faith Ringgold 1993 Awardee


NIE Blog Black History Month profile: Lucille Clifton

Spotlight on Lucille Clifton

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Lucille Clifton’s career as a poet was off to a sensational start. In 1970 she began another career as an author of children’s books. Some of the Days of Everett Anderson was the first of a series about a boy growing up in the inner city. Clifton also wrote for children’s television. She shared an Emmy award as a co-writer of the TV special Free to Be You and Me in 1974.

Clifton was popular with academic critics as well as young readers. Her poetry was minimalist, featuring short, uncapitalized and unrhymed lines. It was powerful without being ornate, expressing in spare, direct language her life experiences and her imagination of history, mythology and politics.

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Amifika by Lucille Clifton 1978 Awardee


The Prolific Pen Of Naomi Shihab Nye

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It might be a challenging question to ask Naomi Shihab Nye where she’s from. Nye is a poet-novelist-essayist, born in St. Louis, but raised in both San Antonio and Jerusalem. Nye is Palestinian-American, and her large body of work reflects the many influences in her life, from West Texas to the Middle East.

She visits Ashland for a speaking engagement tonight (February 13th), and drops by the studio for an advance on the evening. We just try to fit a sampling of her skills and wisdom into a single hour.

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Habibi written by Naomi Shihab Nye 1998 Awardee


These books encourage acceptance of self and others

“The books reviewed today take a look at the idea that we are different from one another, and that there is nothing wrong with that. Instilling this idea in children will help them see others with greater sensitivity and compassion, and I think we can all agree the world needs more of that attitude.”

“My Brother Sam is Dead” by James Lincoln Collier

“Number the Stars” by Lois Lowry.

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Number the Stars written by Lois Lowry 1990 Awardee

My Brother Sam Is Dead written by James Lincoln Collier and Christopher Collier 1975 Awardee


An Open Letter to School Librarians: Silence Is not Golden

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Every day students of different races, nationalities, and sexual orientations walk through our doors. Our libraries must be safe spaces for them, since the outside world has become increasingly unsafe.

An elementary school librarian in Wisconsin is resisting through read-alouds featuring immigrants, biographies of inventors from other countries, and picture book biographies which mention protesters and women’s equality. Some of the books she recommends are Jairo Buitrago’s Two White Rabbits, Paula Yoo’s Twenty-Two Cents, and Duncan Tonatiuh’s Separate is Never Equal.

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Separate is Never Equal: Sylvia Mendez and her family’s fight for desegregation, written and illustrated by Duncan Tonatiuh 2015 Awardee


Fall 2017 Children’s Sneak Previews

Danza!: Amalia Hernndez and Mexico’s Folkloric Ballet by Duncan Tonatiuh, profiling the dancer, choreographer, and founder of the titular dance company

Twelve Days in May: Freedom Ride, 1961 by Larry Dane Brimner

42 Is Not Just a Number: The Odyssey of Jackie Robinson, American Hero by Doreen Rappaport, chronicling the extraordinary life of the man who broke the “rules” of segregation in athletics and beyond

Elephant & Piggie Like Reading!: It’s Shoe Time by Mo Willems and Bryan Collier, in which Sue is all set for the big day-except for which shoes she will choose to wear.

Ada Lovelace and the Computer by Tanya Lee Stone, illus. by Marjorie Priceman, celebrating the woman recognized as the first computer programmer

All the Way to Havana by Margarita Engle, illus. by Mike Curato, featuring a Cuban family’s road trip into the city of colorful buildings and iconic classic cars

Miguel’s Brave Knight: Young Miguel de Cervantes and His Dream of Don Quixote by Margarita Engle, illus. by Ral Coln, spotlighting the early life of one of the greatest writers in the Spanish language

Art! by Ral Coln, about a skateboarding boy’s transformative first visit to an art museum.

Dangerous Jane by Suzanne Slade, illus. by Alice Ratterree, profiling social activist and Nobel Peace Prize winner Jane Addams

Jada Jones: Rock Star by Kelly Starling Lyons, illus. by Vanessa Brantley Newton, in which a fourth grader who loves science and rocks must figure out how to make new friends when her best friend moves away

A Night Out with Mama by Quvenzhan Walls, illus. by Vanessa Brantley Newton, featuring a girl celebrating a very special night with a special person

In Your Hands by Carole Boston Weatherford, illus. by Brian Pinkney, a picture book that speaks of a black mother’s hopes and dreams for her child

Forest World by Margarita Engle, featuring a contemporary Cuban-American boy who visits his family’s village in Cuba for the first time and meets a sister he didn’t know he had.

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Separate is Never Equal: Sylvia Mendez and her family’s fight for desegregation, written and illustrated by Duncan Tonatiuh 2015 Awardee

We Are One: The Story of Bayard Rustin by Larry Dane Brimner 2008 Awardee

Birmingham Sunday by Larry Dane Brimner 2011 Awardee

Martin’s Big Words: The Life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. written by Doreen Rappaport with artwork by Bryan Collier 2002 Awardee

Almost Astronauts: 13 Women Who Dared to Dream by Tanya Lee Stone 2010 Awardee

Silver People: Voices from the Panama Canal by Margarita Engle 2015 Awardee

The Surrender Tree: Poems of Cuba’s Struggle for Freedom, written by Margarita Engle 2009 Awardee

A Band of Angels: A Story Inspired written by the Jubilee Singers by Deborah Hopkinson, illustrated by Ral Coln, 2000 Awardee

We Shall Overcome: The Story of a Song written by Debbie Levy and illustrated by Vanessa Brantley-Newton 2014 Awardee

Birmingham, 1963 by Carole Boston Weatherford 2008 Awardee

Sit-In: How Four Friends Stood Up by Sitting Down by Andrea Davis Pinkney, illustrated by Brian Pinkney 2011 Awardee

Sojourner Truth’s Step-Stomp Stride, by Andrea Davis Pinkney & Brian Pinkney 2010 Awardee


9 Extraordinary African American Women In The Arts Who Changed US History

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1. Faith Ringgold
One of her most notable works is her series of paintings titled American People, “which portrayed the civil rights movement from a female perspective,” according to Biography. She was also heavily involved in activism, and made posters in support of the Black Panther Party.

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6. Edwidge Danticat
She has won many awards for her writing, including the American Book Award, a National Book Critics Circle Award, and a MacArthur “Genius” Fellowship.

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Aunt Harriet’s Underground Railroad in the Sky by Faith Ringgold 1993 Awardee

Mama’s Nightingale: A Story of Immigration and Separation written by Edwidge Danticat, illustrated by Leslie Staub 2016 Awardee


Books offer insight to black history
Tales for young people that have won Coretta Scott King awards.

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Coretta Scott King Illustrator Award
RADIANT CHILD: THE STORY OF YOUNG ARTIST JEAN-MICHEL BASQUIAT. Illustrated and written by Javaka Steptoe.
Also the Randolph Caldecott Medal recipient for the most “distinguished American picture book for children,” this exquisitely illustrated narrative is about artist Jean-Michel Basquiat. Steptoe aspired to echo the unique collage style of Basquiat.

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Illustrator Honor Books
FREEDOM IN CONGO SQUARE. Illustrated by R. Gregory Christie. Written by Carol Boston Weatherford.
Also a Caldecott Honor book, Freedom’s poetic text honors those who “flocked to New Orleans’ Congo Square. Everyone celebrated the freedom of an afternoon when the harshness of the workweek could be temporarily suspended. The figures within Christie’s paintings capture the drudgery and pain of the work as well as the joy of music.

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Hot Day on Abbott Avenue by Karen English, with collage art of Javaka Steptoe 2005 Awardee

The Book Itch: Freedom, Truth & Harlem’s Greatest Bookstore by Vaunda Micheaux Nelson, illustrated by R. Gregory Christie 2016 Awardee

Birmingham, 1963 by Carole Boston Weatherford 2008 Awardee


NAACP Image Award Nominees

The NAACP announced nominees for its 48th annual Image Awards, which celebrate the accomplishments of people of color in Television, Recording (Music), Literary (Books), Motion Picture, Documentary (film and television), Writing (for film and television), Directing (for film and television), and Animated/CGI (for film and television). Winners will be announced Saturday, February 11, 2017 during a ceremony airing live on TV One at 9PM EST.

LITERATURE

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Outstanding Literary Work - Fiction
"Another Brooklyn” - Jacqueline Woodson (HarperCollins /Amistad)

Outstanding Literary Work - Children

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“A Poem for Peter: The Story of Ezra Jack Keats and the Creation of The Snowy Day” - Andrea Davis Pinkney (Author), Lou Fancher (Illustrator), Steve Johnson (Illustrator), (Viking Children’s Books)

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“Radiant Child: The Story of Young Artist Jean-Michel Basquiat” - Javaka Steptoe (Little, Brown Books for Young Readers)

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Each Kindness written by Jacqueline Woodson, illustrated by E.B. Lewis 2013 Awardee

From the Notebooks of Melanin Sun by Jacqueline Woodson 1996 Awardee

I Hadn’t Meant to Tell You This by Jacqueline Woodson 1995 Awardee

Sit-In: How Four Friends Stood Up by Sitting Down by Andrea Davis Pinkney, illustrated by Brian Pinkney 2011 Awardee

Sojourner Truth’s Step-Stomp Stride, by Andrea Davis Pinkney & Brian Pinkney 2010 Awardee

Hot Day on Abbott Avenue by Karen English, with collage art of Javaka Steptoe 2005 Awardee


Student board members defend not banning controversial book

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Jacob Walton, Tyler Little and Jenna Akers all defended inclusion of author Tanya Lee Stone’s 2006 novel, “A Bad Boy Can Be Good For a Girl,” in the library during Thursday’s meeting of the Board of Education. All three are non-voting student members of the Currituck Board of Education.

The three students gave their perspectives on the novel after school board member Will Crodick criticized school officials’ decision to keep the book available for check-out by high school students.

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Almost Astronauts: 13 Women Who Dared to Dream by Tanya Lee Stone 2010 Awardee


The Amazing Girl Rising Documentary Is Now a Book

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Tanya Lee Stone, an acclaimed author of nonfiction books for kids and young adults, partnered with the filmmakers to adapt the film for print, taking advantage of the hours upon hours of taped interviews they collected during the reporting process. She added to that her own research on education, and wove it all together to tell the story of how educating girls can change lives, shape economies, and lift entire communities out of poverty.

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Almost Astronauts: 13 Women Who Dared to Dream by Tanya Lee Stone 2010 Awardee

Since 1953, the Jane Addams Children’s Book Award annually acknowledges books published in the U.S. during the previous year. Books commended by the Award address themes of topics that engage children in thinking about peace, justice, world community and/or equality of the sexes and all races. The books also must meet conventional standards of literacy and artistic excellence.

A national committee chooses winners and honor books for younger and older children.

Click here to read more about the 2016 Awards.

Books to Help Kids Understand What It’s Like to Be a Refugee

Mama’s Nightingale: A Story of Immigration and Separation by Edwidge Danticat, illustrated by Leslie Staub
Danticat’s celebration of storytelling and the bond between mother and child is an empowering one. Saya, whose mother is being detained, writes a story inspired by her mother’s experience. When her father sends Saya’s story to a newspaper, she learns firsthand that one voice, one story, can make a difference.

Inside Out and Back Again by Thanhha Lai
Lai’s bestselling Newbery Honor book, written in short free verse, powerfully captures the alienation felt by a child forced into a new and often unwelcoming world. As 10-year-old Ha tries to adjust to life in Alabama, where she is bullied by her peers and befriended by a teacher who has some understanding of her experiences back in Vietnam, readers can empathize with Ha and all of those who are considered “foreigners” in this story of strength and resilience.

The Red Pencil by Andrea Davis Pinkney, illustrated by Shane W. Evans
Children’s literature powerhouse Andrea Davis Pinkney uses verse to tell Amira’s tale of loss, hardship, and ultimately hope. Pinkney notably offers a detailed picture of Amira’s rich home life and environment in Sudan before it is destroyed by war, and readers will celebrate when a silent Amira is offered the gift of literacy that reminds her that her voice matters and has enormous power.

A Long Walk to Water by Linda Sue Park
Salva Dut led a group of over 100 boys on a harrowing journey through danger, sickness, and starvation from war-torn South Sudan to a refugee camp in Kenya. He was then relocated to the United States, where he got a college degree and went on to found Water for South Sudan, an organization that provides deep water wells in South Sudan. The bestselling A Long Walk to Water, based on Mr. Dut’s experience, has inspired children around the world to make a difference in their communities and beyond. Both Salva Dut and Linda Sue Park have delivered TED talks detailing their work, the power of diverse stories, and the ability of young people to create change in our world: Salva Dut, “I Kept Walking”; and Linda Sue Park, “Can a Children’s Book Change the World?”.

How I Became a Ghost by Tim Tingle
The first in a trilogy, Tingle’s novel tells the story of Isaac, a 10-year-old member of the Choctaw Nation who is forced from his home in what is now Mississippi and travels through the tragedies of the “Trail of Tears” with his family in 1830. In a review of this “ghost story,” American Indians in Children’s Literature notes that “Scary things do happen - this is a story about the forced relocation of a people, but it is more about the humanity of the people on that trail than it is about that forced relocation.” Tingle offers a full-bodied portrait of an important piece of American history whose legacy lives on.

Bamboo People by Mitali Perkins
Tu Reh, a Karenni boy, has witnessed the destruction of his family’s home and bamboo fields by Burmese soldiers. Chiko is a Burmese boy who loves books and has no interest in combat. The boys’ lives intersect when Chiko, forced to become a soldier, is injured and Tu Reh discovers him. Perkins’s delicately told story of the enduring power of compassion is thoughtful and satisfying. A helpful Discussion and Activity Guide and Book Club Guide are available from the publisher.

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Mama’s Nightingale: A Story of Immigration and Separation written by Edwidge Danticat, illustrated by Leslie Staub 2016 Awardee

Inside Out & Back Again by Thanhha Lai 2012 Awardee

Sit-In: How Four Friends Stood Up by Sitting Down by Andrea Davis Pinkney 2011 Awardee

Sojourner Truth’s Step-Stomp Stride, by Andrea Davis Pinkney & Brian Pinkney 2010 Awardee

We March written and illustrated by Shane W. Evans 2013 Awardee

Lillian’s Right to Vote: A Celebration of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 by Jonah Winter, illustrated by Shane W. Evan 2016 Awardee

A Long Walk to Water: Based on a True Story by Linda Sue Park 2011 Awardee

When My Name Was Keoko written by Linda Sue Park 2003 Awardee

Crossing Bok Chitto: told in written form by nationally recognized Choctaw storyteller, Tim Tingle 2007 Awardee

Rickshaw Girl by Mitali Perkins 2008 Awardee


POETRY IN A TIME OF PROTEST By Edwidge Danticat

“Without community, there is no liberation,” the poet and activist Audre Lorde wrote, nearly thirty-five years ago. In our rallying and marching, we rediscovered community in one another.

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Mama’s Nightingale: A Story of Immigration and Separation written by Edwidge Danticat, illustrated by Leslie Staub 2016 Awardee


Booklist Feature Article, Guest Speaker: Real Human Beings by Joseph Bruchac

Today, things are different-for YA literature and writing by and about Native Americans. My favorite reading these days-at the age of 74-is YA. True, there are not enough books truly reflecting indigenous reality. Racial prejudice and cultural stereotyping remain alive and well in the disunited states of America. I’m still asked by students what it was like “when Indians were alive.” But the vitality and variety of YA writing is more exciting than ever before.

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The Heart of a Chief written by Joseph Bruchac 1999 Awardee


Bruchac featured storyteller at annual Dawnlands Storyfest

Bruchac is perhaps best known for his bestselling “Keepers of the Earth: Native American Stories and Environmental Activities for Children” and other titles in the “Keepers” series, which integrate science and folklore in highly entertaining and interactive formats that make them ideal for classrooms and family libraries alike.

Joseph Bruchac was the featured storyteller at the annual Dawnlands Storyfest at the Mariposa Museum and World Culture Center in Peterborough. He was joined by his son Jesse Bruchac, a leading figure in indigenous efforts to preserve the Abenaki language and culture.

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The Heart of a Chief written by Joseph Bruchac 1999 Awardee


20 Children’s Books From Around The World To Read For Multicultural Children’s Book Day

January 27, marks the fourth annual Multicultural Children’s Book Day, a day-long celebration of reading diversely that focuses exclusively on global and multicultural children’s books.

‘Drum Dream Girl: How One Girl’s Courage Changed Music’ by Margarita Engle and Rafael Lopez

'Thunder Boy Jr.’ by Sherman Alexie and Yuyi Morales

'Freedom in Congo Square’ by Carole Boston Weatherford and R. Gregory Christie

'The Book Itch: Freedom, Truth, & Harlem’s Greatest Bookstore’ by Vaunda Micheaux Nelson and R. Gregory Christie

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Silver People: Voices from the Panama Canal by Margarita Engle 2015 year Awardee

The Surrender Tree: Poems of Cuba’s Struggle for Freedom, written by Margarita Engle 2009 Awardee

Harvesting Hope: The Story of Cesar Chavez, written by Kathleen Krull, illustrated by Yuyi Morales 2004 Awardee

Birmingham, 1963 by Carole Boston Weatherford 2008 Awardee

The Book Itch: Freedom, Truth & Harlem’s Greatest Bookstore by Vaunda Micheaux Nelson, illustrated by R. Gregory Christie 2016 year Awardee

Film festival, discussions highlight Black History Month celebrations in Athens, GA

The national annual “African American Read-In,” this year is dedicated to Bettye Stroud, a former public school media specialist and the author of several illustrated children’s books that chronicle African American History.

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Belle, the Last Mule at Gee’s Bend written by Calvin Alexander Ramsey and Bettye Stroud 2012 Awardee


3 New Black History Month Reads for Kids

Lift Your Light a Little Higher: The Story of Stephen Bishop: Slave-Explorer, by Heather Hensen, illustrated by Bryan Collier Join Stephen Bishop, a slave in 1840, as he lights the way through the largest cave system in the world. Bishop served as tour guide in Kentucky’s Mammoth Cave, where he found a measure of independence in the darkness.

The Youngest Marcher: The Story of Audrey Faye Hendricks, by Cynthia Levinson, illustrated by Vanessa Brantley Newton Audrey was just 9 years old in 1963, during the civil rights protests in Birmingham, Ala., but that didn’t stop her from standing up and speaking out against racial segregation. Learn how her confidence and bravery made a difference.

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Martin’s Big Words: The Life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. written by Doreen Rappaport with artwork by Bryan Collier 2002 Awardee

We’ve Got a Job: The 1963 Birmingham Children’s March written by Cynthia Levinson 2013 Awardee

We Shall Overcome: The Story of a Song written by Debbie Levy and illustrated by Vanessa Brantley-Newton 2014 Awardee


How the smallest, most abundant bacteria inspired a children’s book series

Institute Professor Penny Chisholm teams up with author and illustrator Molly Bang to write environmental children’s book series.

Chisholm partnered with her longtime friend, award winning children’s book author and illustrator Molly Bang, to write a series of children’s books explaining these fundamental environmental processes in an approachable way.

The series is meant to stand the test of time by explaining fundamental processes, but that doesn’t stop Chisholm and Bang from briefly acknowledging humans’ uncertain impact on the environment by touching on topics such as climate change and fossil fuels. Chisholm asks, “If you don’t understand that the mass of plants come from carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, and that there’s a massive exchange of CO2, from photosynthesis and respiration, how can you understand the role of fossil fuels and climate change?”

The illustrations, hand-painted by Bang, are colorful and animated, but are also structurally and anatomically correct. Bang’s parents were scientists, and she learns the science behind the illustrations from Chisholm.

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When Sophie Gets Angry – Really, Really Angry… written by Molly Bang 2000 Awardee


AUTHOR APPEARANCES

Library observes Black History Month

Black History Month will be observed in a series of free February programs and activities at main library and various branches of the Public Library of Youngstown and Mahoning County.

Andrea Davis Pinkney, the author who lives in upstate New York, will appear at 10 a.m. Feb. 24 at the Austintown branch, at 1 p.m. Feb. 24 at the Newport branch and at 11 a.m. Feb. 25 at the main library.

Her program, for schoolchildren and adults, will feature audience participation, singing, show and tell and readings from her many books.

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Sit-In: How Four Friends Stood Up by Sitting Down by Andrea Davis Pinkney 2011 Awardee

Sojourner Truth’s Step-Stomp Stride, by Andrea Davis Pinkney & Brian Pinkney 2010 Awardee


Bloomfield, Paterson talks to highlight black history

Two prominent authors seeking to improve race relations will speak at schools in Bloomfield and Paterson celebrating Black History Month next week.

Ann Bausum, author of “The March Against Fear,” a National Geographic publication detailing a 1966 civil rights march across Mississippi spurred by the shooting of a black man by a white man, will speak along with Michael H. Cottman, author of a youth-oriented book detailing the history of a slave ship that sank off of the coast of Florida in 1700.

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Marching to the Mountaintop: How Poverty, Labor Fights and Civil Rights Set the Stage for Martin Luther King Jr’s Final Hours, written by Ann Bausum 2013 Awardee

With Courage and Cloth: Winning the Fight for a Woman’s Right to Vote, by Ann Bausum 2005 Awardee


Tickets available for 2017 Arbuthnot Lecture featuring Jacqueline Woodson

The lecture, titled “What Gets Left Behind: Stories From The Great Migration,” will be held at 7 p.m. on Saturday, April 1, 2017 in the W. W. Hootie Johnson Performance Hall, in the Darla Moore School of Business, at the University of South Carolina. Required tickets are free for the lecture.

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Each Kindness written by Jacqueline Woodson 2013 Awardee

From the Notebooks of Melanin Sun written by Jacqueline Woodson 1996 Awardee

I Hadn’t Meant to Tell You This written by Jacqueline Woodson 1995 Awardee


Choctaw Storyteller Tim Tingle At Mariposa Storytelling Festival

The 30th Mariposa Storytelling Festival will be celebrating its Grand Finale weekend, Mar. 10 ? 12, at the Mariposa County High School. Sunday’s “Brunch and Stories with the Tellers” will be at the Mariposa Senior Center.

His first children’s book, Crossing Bok Chitto, garnered over twenty state and national awards, and was an Editor’s Choice in the New York Times Book Review.

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Crossing Bok Chitto: told in written form by nationally recognized Choctaw storyteller, Tim Tingle 2007 Awardee

Since 1953, the Jane Addams Children’s Book Award annually acknowledges books published in the U.S. during the previous year. Books commended by the Award address themes of topics that engage children in thinking about peace, justice, world community and/or equality of the sexes and all races. The books also must meet conventional standards of literacy and artistic excellence.

A national committee chooses winners and honor books for younger and older children.

Read more about the 2016 Awards.

‘A Very Incredible Day’: Javaka Steptoe on His 2017 Caldecott Medal

Steptoe admired Basquiat’s courage, conviction, and vision. “I like that that he stood up for himself,” he said. “He talked about history. His curiosity about the world was very impressive. And the way he put everything together and the way he used images is very poetic.”

“Whatever I’m interested in saying - and people don’t necessarily have to agree with me - if I have something to say, I have a voice that’s going to be heard. It’s kind of like Spider-Man: with great power comes great responsibility. I appreciate that. I hope to be seen as someone who thinks deeply and cares about the world, and cares about what’s going on.”

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Hot Day on Abbott Avenue by Karen English, with collage art of Javaka Steptoe 2005 Awardee


Ruby Bridges, Civil Rights Activist to Speak at ASI Lectureship

“ASI is honored to bring Ruby Bridges to our campus,” ASI president senior Emily Mylhousen said. “Our country is still hurting from racial tensions, as we often forget that the Civil Rights Movement is not as far back in our country’s history as we would like to think. Bridges’ message will surely remind us for our country’s history and will shed light on such injustice and inequality.”

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Through My Eyes by Ruby Bridges 2000 Awardee


Naomi Shihab Nye to deliver 2018 Arbuthnot Honor Lecture

Writer and Poet Naomi Shihab Nye will deliver the 2018 May Hill Arbuthnot Honor Lecture. The announcement was made today by the Association for Library Service to Children (ALSC), a division of the American Library Association (ALA), during the ALA Midwinter Meeting & Exhibits held Jan. 20- 24, in Atlanta, Georgia.

“A wise and lyrical observer, Naomi Shihab Nye consistently draws on her heritage and writing to attest to our shared humanity,” stated 2018 Arbuthnot Committee Chair Elizabeth Ramsey Bird.

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Habibi written by Naomi Shihab Nye 1998 Awardee


Noted novelist offers writing tips to fourth graders preparing for state exams (VIDEO)

Award-winning author Edwidge Danticat is accustomed to sharing her insights into Haitian-American life with an international audience.

But on Thursday, she was before a smaller group ? the fourth-graders at Barton Elementary School in Lake Worth. She offered tips as they prepared for their own writing challenge, the Florida Standards Assessment.

“This is the age when they have a glimpse of the possibility of the future,” said Danticat, 48, a mother of two who lives in Miami. “Every single one of them has a story to tell. We want to nurture their creativity at the same time they’re preparing for these tests.”

[One student], [age] 11, said she aspires to write with the feeling and empathy Danticat expresses in her novels. She said she treasures Danticat’s book, “Mama’s Nightingale: A Story of Immigration and Separation,” because her family had a similar experience. The book tells the story of Saya, whose mother is imprisoned in an immigration detention center.

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Mama?s Nightingale: A Story of Immigration and Separation written by Edwidge Danticat, illustrated by Leslie Staub 2016 Awardee


The Green Book’s Calvin Ramsey to showcase historical Huntington locations

Marshall University will host a documentary screening and discussion by critically acclaimed playwright and author, Calvin Alexander Ramsey, at 7 p.m. Friday, Feb. 3.

“There are several buildings still standing in Huntington that were listed as safe places to travel in The Green Book,” Ramsey said. “I hope students will learn of this history and realize that anyone can make a difference. This book shows how African Americans were very much united and talking about its implications in today’s world is more important than ever.”

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Belle, the Last Mule at Gee?s Bend written by Calvin Alexander Ramsey and Bettye Stroud, illustrated by John Holyfield 2012 Awardee

Ruth and the Green Book by Calvin Alexander Ramsey with Gwen Strauss and illustrated by Floyd Cooper 2011 Awardee


Spring 2017 Children’s Announcements

A Promising Life: A Novel of Coming of Age with America by Emily Arnold McCully (July 25). Set in 19th-century St. Louis, Jean Baptiste Charonneau learns first-hand the clash between what some call progress and the consequences it has for Native Americans. Ages 12-up.

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The Escape of Oney Judge: Martha Washington’s Slave Finds Freedom written and illustrated by Emily Arnold McCully 2008 Awardee


An Evening to Honor the Legacy of Lucille Clifton

“Nurturing the Compassionate Community: An Evening to Honor the Legacy of Lucille Clifton” on Wednesday, March 1 at 7:30 p.m.

The evening will feature poetry readings and reflections to honor St. Mary’s College’s former Distinguished Professor of the Humanities Lucille Clifton.

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Amifika by Lucille Clifton 1978 Awardee


Get kids inspired with tales of civil rights, being different

Audrey Faye Hendricks got her start in peaceful protest at age 9, when she was one of more than 3,000 elementary-schoolers and teens arrested in the 1963 Children’s March to support civil rights for all Americans.

“Audrey knew all about segregation,” writes Austin author Cynthia Levinson, who shares Audrey’s story in “The Youngest Marcher” (Atheneum/Simon & Schuster).

Levinson ? who will read from and sign “Marcher” Jan. 28 at BookPeople ? spent three years interviewing marchers and doing research as part of her work on “We’ve Got A Job: The 1963 Birmingham Children’s March” (Peachtree, 2012), designed for readers age 10 and older. Audrey’s story is showcased in “Marcher,” a picture book for younger readers, highlighted by illustrations from Vanessa Brantley Newton that take readers inside Audrey’s world, from the dinner table where her mother gives her the side-eye for talking out of turn to a dismal jail cell with its bare mattress and stained sheet.

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We?ve Got a Job: The 1963 Birmingham Children?s March written by Cynthia Levinson 2013 Awardee

We Shall Overcome: The Story of a Song written by Debbie Levy and illustrated by Vanessa Brantley-Newton 2014 Awardee


EBONY RELEASES FEBRUARY BLACK HISTORY/BLACK FUTURE ISSUE

Illustration by Kadir Nelson

For February, EBONY announces the release of its annual The Black History/Black Future issue, aptly titled “Yes, We Still Can: How the Community Will Save Itself,” featuring an exclusive original collectible cover by renowned illustrator Kadir Nelson.

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The Village That Vanished written by Ann Grifalconi and illustrated by Kadir Nelson 2003 Awardee

Heart and Soul: The Story of America and African Americans written and illustrated by Kadir Nelson 2012 Awardee


Black America : Art & Activism with Faith Ringgold (VIIDEO)

Artist, Author and Activist, Faith Ringgold joins Carol Jenkins to explore pieces of her work, movement and inspirations. Faith Ringgold is the recipient of over 75 awards, including 22 honorary Doctor of Fine Arts Degrees and a Lifetime Achievement honor from the College Art Association. She is also known for many of her children’s books such as “Aunt Harriet’s Underground Railroad In The Sky”, “The Invisible Princess and "If a Bus Could Talk; The Story of Ms. Rosa Parks” (which won the NAACP’s Image Award in 2000).

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Aunt Harriet’s Underground Railroad in the Sky by Faith Ringgold 1993 Awardee

Since 1953, the Jane Addams Children’s Book Award annually acknowledges books published in the U.S. during the previous year. Books commended by the Award address themes of topics that engage children in thinking about peace, justice, world community and/or equality of the sexes and all races. The books also must meet conventional standards of literacy and artistic excellence.

A national committee chooses winners and honor books for younger and older children.

Click here to read more about the 2016 Awards.

Rep. John Lewis: I hope my book inspires people to ‘speak up and speak out’

Rep. John Lewis, the 76-year-old congressman and civil rights activist won yet another prize for his graphic memoir, “March: Book Three”: the Walter Dean Myers Award for Outstanding Children’s Literature.

The latest award - the Walter, as it’s known - is given annually by We Need Diverse Books (WNDB), a nonprofit organization that promotes diversity in children’s publishing.

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Now Is Your Time! The African-American Struggle for Freedom written by Walter Dean Myers 1992 Awardee

Patrol: An American Soldier in Vietnam written by Walter Dean Myers 2003 Awardee


Seven Civil Rights Heroes to Teach Your Kids About

A book about Ida B. Wellsto share with kids from 8 to 12: Ida B. Wells: Let the Truth Be Told by Walter Dean Myers (the winner of two Newbery Medals and five Coretta Scott King Awards), illustrated by Bonnie Christenson. The book uses lots of quotes from Wells herself, and the watercolor illustrations are powerful.

Philip Hoose’s Claudette Colvin: Twice Toward Justice is a spectacularly reported book (Hoose pursued Colvin, who had an unlisted phone number and was living in obscurity, for four years before she agreed to tell her story) that won the National Book Award for Young People’s Literature in 2009 and a Newbery Honor in 2010.

Ruby Bridges book, Through My Eyes will resonate with kids 7 and up. The very youngest children will understand how scary this must have been for a 6-year-old, and how brave she was.

Fannie Lou Hamer’s story is showcased in the poetic, lyrical Voice of Freedom: Fannie Lou Hamer, a 2016 Caldecott Honor Book (the publisher recommends it for kids 9-12) by Carole Boston Weatherford, illustrated with potent multimedia collages by Ekua Holmes.

We Are One: The Story of Bayard Rustin by Larry Dane Brinmer, aimed at readers age 9-11. An adviser to the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., he promoted nonviolent resistance, participated in one of the first Freedom Rides, organized the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, and fought tirelessly for marginalized communities at home and abroad. As an openly gay African-American, Mr. Rustin stood at the intersection of several of the fights for equal rights.

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Now Is Your Time! The African-American Struggle for Freedom written by Walter Dean Myers 1992 Awardee

Patrol: An American Soldier in Vietnam written by Walter Dean Myers 2003 Awardee

Hey, Little Ant written by Phillip and Hannah Hoose 1999 Awardee

Claudette Colvin by Phillip Hoose 2010 Awardee

Through My Eyes by Ruby Bridges 2000 Awardee

Birmingham, 1963 by Carole Boston Weatherford 2008 Awardee

We Are One: The Story of Bayard Rustin by Larry Dane Brimner 2008 Awardee

Birmingham Sunday by Larry Dane Brimner 2011 Awardee


Barnhill, Steptoe, 'March: Book Three’ Win Newbery, Caldecott, Printz

Javaka Steptoe has won the 2017 Randolph Caldecott Medal for Radiant Child: The Story of Young Artist Jean-Michel Basquiat (Little, Brown), edited by Deirdre Jones.

There were four Caldecott Honor Books including Freedom in Congo Square, illustrated by R. Gregory Christie, written by Carole Boston Weatherford (Little Bee).

There were four Sibert Honors including We Will Not Be Silent: The White Rose Student Resistance Movement That Defied Adolf Hitler by Russell Freedman (Clarion).

Naomi Shihab Nye was chosen to deliver the 2018 May Hill Arbuthnot Honor Lecture.

The Coretta Scott King Illustrator award went to Javaka Steptoe for Radiant Child: The Story of Young Artist Jean-Michel Basquiat (Little, Brown).

Three King Illustrator Honor Books were chosen including Freedom in Congo Square, illustrated by R. Gregory Christie, written by Carole Boston Weatherford (Little Bee).

Hillary Rodham Clinton: A Woman Living History by Karen Blumenthal (Feiwel and Friends) was a finalist for the YALSA Award for Excellence in Nonfiction for Young Adults

There were two Belpr Illustrator Honor books: The Princess and the Warrior: A Tale of Two Volcanoes by Duncan Tonatiuh (Abrams).

The Andrew Carnegie Medal for excellence in children’s video went to Ryan Swenar of Dreamscape Media, producer of Drum Dream Girl: How One Girl’s Courage Changed Music, adapted from the book by Margarita Engle.

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Hot Day on Abbott Avenue by Karen English, with collage art of Javaka Steptoe 2005 Awardee

Birmingham, 1963 by Carole Boston Weatherford 2008 Awardee

The Book Itch: Freedom, Truth & Harlem?s Greatest Bookstore by Vaunda Micheaux Nelson, illustrated by R. Gregory Christie 2016 Awardee

Freedom Walkers, written by Russell Freedman 2007 Awardee

Kids at Work: Lewis Hine and the Crusade Against Child Labor written by Russell Freedman 1995 Awardee

Eleanor Roosevelt: A Life of Discovery written by Russell Freedman 1994 Awardee

Habibi written by Naomi Shihab Nye 1998 Awardee

Let Me Play: The Story of Title IX, the Law that Changed the Future of Girls in America by Karen Blumenthal 2006 Awardee

Separate is Never Equal: Sylvia Mendez and her family?s fight for desegregation, written and illustrated by Duncan Tonatiuh 2015 Awardee

Silver People: Voices from the Panama Canal by Margarita Engle 2015 Awardee

The Surrender Tree: Poems of Cuba’s Struggle for Freedom, written by Margarita Engle 2009 Awardee


The Poetry Break: George Ella Lyon

“This is the room that made us who we were:/ book lovers, scholars, people of the word,/ who found a safe place between hard covers.” -George Ella Lyon

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You and Me and Home Sweet Home by George Ella Lyon and Stephanie Anderson 2010 Awardee


Woman was youngest marcher with Dr. King in Selma

Lynda Blackmon Lowery was the youngest person in Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama.

She was 14-years-old when she set out on her trip, and she celebrated her birthday as an activist.

“I turned 15 on the road to freedom, on March 22,” Lowery says.

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Turning 15 on the Road to Freedom: My Story of the 1965 Selma Voting Rights March by Lynda Blackmon Lowery 2016 Awardee


National Book Critics Circle announces finalists

The five finalists for fiction in the running for the NBCC Awards, announced today include “LaRose” by Louise Erdrich

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The Birchbark House by Louise Erdrich 2000 Awardee


Palm Springs Art Museum Celebrates Black History Month With Interactive Exhibition

Palm Springs Art Museum is celebrating Black History Month with a new interactive exhibition titled Intertwining the Fabric of Generations, on-view in the Sheffer/Scheffler Arts Education Space February 2 through February 28. the exhibition features works by noted African-American artist Faith Ringgold alongside narrative quilts created by Palm Springs Unified School District (PSUSD) students.

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Aunt Harriet’s Underground Railroad in the Sky by Faith Ringgold 1993 Awardee


Children’s Book 'Freedom In Congo Square’ Shares A Little-Known Story Of Slave History

The right to peaceably assemble, and the power of gathering together over shared values and traditions, is also what lies at the heart of new children’s book Freedom in Congo Square. a poetic, nonfiction picture book written by Carole Boston Weatherford and illustrated by R. Gregory Christie,

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Birmingham, 1963 by Carole Boston Weatherford 2008 Awardee

The Book Itch: Freedom, Truth & Harlem?s Greatest Bookstore by Vaunda Micheaux Nelson, illustrated by R. Gregory Christie 2016 Awardee


S&S Children’s Authors Protest Yiannopoulos Deal

More than 160 children’s book authors and illustrators have signed a letter to S&S CEO and president Carolyn Reidy protesting the deal.

The letter, which was released Thursday morning, was initially organized by S&S children’s book creators who are clients of the Erin Murphy Literary Agency, but has grown to encompass writers and illustrators across the industry. Signees include Newbery, Caldecott, and National Book Award honorees

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We’ve Got a Job: The 1963 Birmingham Children’s March written by Cynthia Levinson 2013 Awardee

We Shall Overcome: The Story of a Song written by Debbie Levy and illustrated by Vanessa Brantley-Newton 2014 Awardee

Girl Wonder: A Baseball Story in Nine Innings by Deborah Hopkinson, illustrated by Terry Wideners, 2004 Awardee

Shutting Out the Sky: Life in the Tenements of New York 1880-1924 by Deborah Hopkinson 2004 Awardee

A Band of Angels: A Story Inspired written by the Jubilee Singers by Deborah Hopkinson, illustrated by Ral Coln, 2000 Awardee


Sydney Taylor Book Awards Announced: Read the Best Children’s and Young Adult Literature of 2016

This year’s Gold Medalist (the highest honor) in the Younger Readers category is I Dissent: Ruth Bader Ginsburg Makes Her Mark by Debbie Levy, with illustrations by Elizabeth Baddeley.

In the Older Readers Category This year’s silver medals went to A Poem For Peter: The Story of Ezra Jack Keats and the Creation of The Snowy Day by Andrea Davis Pinkney, with illustrations by Steve Johnson and Lou Fancher

The Notable Books for Older Readers included Skating with the Statue of Liberty by Susan Lynn Meyer.

The Notable Books for Younger Readers included On One Foot by Linda Glaser, with illustrations by Nuria Balaguer.

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We Shall Overcome: The Story of a Song written by Debbie Levy and illustrated by Vanessa Brantley-Newton 2014 Awardee

Sit-In: How Four Friends Stood Up by Sitting Down by Andrea Davis Pinkney, illustrated by Brian Pinkney 2011 Awardee

Sojourner Truth?s Step-Stomp Stride, by Andrea Davis Pinkney & Brian Pinkney 2010 Awardee

New Shoes by Susan Lynn Meyer 2016 Awardee

Emma’s Poem: The Voice of the Statue of Liberty by Linda Glaser 2011 Awardee


Thanhha Lai Speaks About Novel 'Inside Out And Back Again’

Lai spoke about her experiences as a refugee during the Vietnam War to eighth graders at Pierre Van Cortlandt.

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Inside Out & Back Again by Thanhha Lai 2012 Awardee


Writers Resist Protest Brings Thousands to NYPL, Trump Tower

More than 2,000 artists, writers, and readers gathered at the steps of the New York Public Library on January 15 in the name of defending free expression and the free press.

The Writers Resist protest was launched by poet and Vida co-founder Erin Belieu and was co-sponsored in New York by PEN America. The protest, held the day before the birthday of Martin Luther King, Jr., brought writers including U.S. poets laureate Rita Dove and Robert Pinsky, comics artist Art Spiegelman, and author Jacqueline Woodson from the steps of the New York Public Library to the shadow of Trump Tower 15 blocks north.

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Each Kindness written by Jacqueline Woodson, illustrated by E.B. Lewis 2013 Awardee

From the Notebooks of Melanin Sun by Jacqueline Woodson 1996 Awardee

I Hadn?t Meant to Tell You This by Jacqueline Woodson 1995 Awardee


Illustrator Event & TFK’s Birthday Celebration

Jamie Hogan, Illustrator of Island Birthday, will be joining us to celebrate and sign copies of her book. We will also be celebrating TFK’s 7th birthday! Books will be on sale through Longfellow Books.

January 28th @ 10:30am
LAND SHARK & ISLAND BIRTHDAY

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Rickshaw Girl by Mitali Perkins, illustrations by Jamie Hogan 2008 Awardee

Since 1953, the Jane Addams Children’s Book Award annually acknowledges books published in the U.S. during the previous year. Books commended by the Award address themes of topics that engage children in thinking about peace, justice, world community and/or equality of the sexes and all races. The books also must meet conventional standards of literacy and artistic excellence.

A national committee chooses winners and honor books for younger and older children.

Click here to read more about the 2016 Awards.

Bridge Street Theatre to Celebrate Black History Month with TURNING 15 ON THE ROAD TO FREEDOM

In celebration of Black History Month, an electrifying first-hand account of the 1965 march from Selma to Montgomery takes the stage at Catskill’s Bridge Street Theatre on February 10, 11, and 12.

Originally developed at Fiorello LaGuardia High School for Music, Art, and Performing Arts in NYC, this stage adaptation of Lynda Blackmon Lowery’s award-winning book for young readers is directed by actress, author, director and teacher Ally Sheedy and powerfully performed by dynamic young actress Damaras Obi.

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Turning 15 on the Road to Freedom: My Story of the 1965 Selma Voting Rights March by Lynda Blackmon Lowery as told to Elspeth Leacock and Susan Buckley, 2016 Awardee


Suggested reading on civil rights movement and Martin Luther King Jr.

Elementary school

“Seeds of Freedom: The Peaceful Integration of Huntsville, Alabama” by Hester Bass; illustrated by E. B. Lewis
“We March” by Shane W. Evans
“Sit-In: How Four Friends Stood Up by Sitting Down” by Andrea Davis Pinkney; illustrated by Brian Pinkney
“Belle, the Last Mule at Gee’s Bend” by Calvin Alexander Ramsey and Bettye Stroud; illustrated by John Holyfield
“28 Days: Moments in Black History that Changed the World” by Charles R. Smith; illustrated by Shane W. Evans
“Separate Is Never Equal: Sylvia Mendez and Her Family’s Fight for Desegregation” by Duncan Tonatiuh
“Lillian’s Right to Vote” by Jonah Winter; illustrated by Shane Evans
“Freedom in Congo Square” by Carole Boston Weatherford

Middle school

“Marching to the Mountaintop: How Poverty, Labor Fights, and Civil Rights Set the Stage for Martin Luther King Jr.’s Final Hours” by Ann Bausum
“Birmingham Sunday” by Larry Dane Brimner
“The Girl from the Tar Paper School: Barbara Rose Johns and the Advent of the Civil Rights Movement” by Teri Kanefield
“Turning 15 on the Road to Freedom: My Story of the 1965 Selma Voting Rights March” by Lynda Blackmon Lowery as told to Elspeth Leacock and Susan Buckley; illustrated by PJ Loughran
“Voice of Freedom: Fannie Lou Hamer: The Spirit of the Civil Rights Movement” by Carole Boston Weatherford; illustrated by Ekua Holmes
“Revolution” by Deborah Wiles
“Brown Girl Dreaming” by Jacqueline Woodson

High school and older

“Black & White: The Confrontation Between Reverend Fred L. Shuttlesworth and Eugene ?Bull’ Connor” by Larry Dane Brimner
“We’ve Got a Job: The 1963 Birmingham Children’s March” by Cynthia Levinson
“No Crystal Stair: A Documentary Novel of the Life and Work of Lewis Michaux, Harlem Bookseller” by Vaunda Micheaux Nelson; illustrated by R. Gregory Christie
“Marching for Freedom: Walk Together, Children, and Don’t You Grow Weary” by Elizabeth Partridge

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Illustrator Kadir Nelson Envisions Martin Luther King Jr. for Cover of New Yorker

THIS WEEK’S THE NEW YORKER boasts a cover image of Martin Luther King Jr., by Los Angeles artist Kadir Nelson. In the illustration, the civil rights legend’s brow is furrowed.

“What would Dr. King think of the world today? My image is a celebration of Dr. King and his vision. What happened to his dream of racial and economic equality, and what is the impact of non-violent resistance over half a century later?” - Kadir Nelson, The New Yorker

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The Village That Vanished written by Ann Grifalconi and illustrated by Kadir Nelson 2003 Awardee

Heart and Soul: The Story of America and African Americans written and illustrated by Kadir Nelson 2012 Awardee


Remembering King: 10 Books to Celebrate M.L. King Jr. Day

Martin Luther King, Jr.: Man of Peace ? Patricia & Fredrick Jr. McKissack
The simple text and illustrations describe the life and accomplishments of the revered civil rights pioneer

I Have a Dream - Kadir Nelson
On August 28, 1963, on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial during the March on Washington, Martin Luther King gave one of the most powerful and memorable speeches in our nation’s history. His words, paired with Caldecott Honor winner Kadir Nelson’s magnificent paintings, make for a picture book certain to be treasured by children and adults alike.

I’ve Seen the Promised Land: The Life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. - Walter Dean Myers
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., is one of the most celebrated figures of the twentieth century. A crusader for nonviolent social justice, he led African Americans in their demands for equality through peaceful protests during one of the most tumultuous times in recent history. Set against key moments in the civil rights movement, here is the story of the powerful, eloquent spiritual leader and his belief that nonviolence could be used to overcome racial discrimination.

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A Long Hard Journey: The Story of the Pullman Porter written by Patricia and Fredrick McKissack 1990 Awardee

The Village That Vanished written by Ann Grifalconi and illustrated by Kadir Nelson 2003 Awardee

Heart and Soul: The Story of America and African Americans written and illustrated by Kadir Nelson 2012 Awardee

Now Is Your Time! The African-American Struggle for Freedom written by Walter Dean Myers 1992 Awardee

Patrol: An American Soldier in Vietnam written by Walter Dean Myers 2003 Awardee


NBC News: From Hashtag to Movement to Book: #WeNeedDiverseBooks Publishes First Anthology

started as a hashtag response to an all-white, all-male panel of children’s book authors at a 2014 BookCon reader event has resulted in a newly-published book aiming to promote diversity in children’s literature.

Since 2014, the hashtag #WeNeedDiverseBooks has grown into the We Need Diverse Books (WNDB) nonprofit organization supporting diversity in children’s literature.

Now, its first book - “Flying Lessons & Other Stories,” a middle-grade anthology for children ages 8 to 12 released this week by Crown Books for Young Readers.

Stories range from basketball dreams to family fiascos, first crushes, new neighborhoods, and more.

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Each Kindness written by Jacqueline Woodson 2013 Awardee

From the Notebooks of Melanin Sun written by Jacqueline Woodson 1996 Awardee

I Hadn’t Meant to Tell You This written by Jacqueline Woodson 1995 Awardee

Crossing Bok Chitto: told in written form by nationally recognized Choctaw storyteller, Tim Tingle 2007 Awardee

Now Is Your Time! The African-American Struggle for Freedom written by Walter Dean Myers 1992 Awardee

Patrol: An American Soldier in Vietnam written by Walter Dean Myers 2003 Awardee


State building named for student whose civil rights strike led to school changes

The newly-renovated state building that houses the Office of the Attorney General has been named after Barbara Johns, Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe announced at the Community Leaders Breakfast honoring Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Friday morning.

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The Girl From the Tar Paper School: Barbara Rose Johns and the advent of the Civil Rights Movement by Teri Kanefield 2015 Awardee


PW Picks: Books of the Week, January 9, 2017

The March Against Fear: The Last Great Walk of the Civil Rights Movement and the Emergence of Black Power Ann Bausum. National Geographic Children’s, $18.99 (144p) ISBN 978-1-4263-2665-3

In a powerful and timely book, Bausum (Stonewall) focuses her attention on the last great march of the civil rights era, the March Against Fear, from Memphis, Tenn., to Jackson, Miss., in June 1966.

This exemplary look into civil rights history concludes with perspective and encouragement regarding ongoing struggles for social change.

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Marching to the Mountaintop: How Poverty, Labor Fights and Civil Rights Set the Stage for Martin Luther King Jr’s Final Hours, written by Ann Bausum 2013 Awardee

With Courage and Cloth: Winning the Fight for a Woman’s Right to Vote, by Ann Bausum 2005 Awardee

Marching to the Mountaintop: How Poverty, Labor Fights and Civil Rights Set the Stage for Martin Luther King Jr’s Final Hours, written by Ann Bausum 2013 Awardee


A Grown-Up Learning Experience for a Nine-Year-Old: A Week in Jail

Cynthia Levinson and illustrator Vanessa Brantley Newton have brought to life the experience of Audrey Faye Hendricks who listened wide-eyed and thoughtfully at grown-up talk about fighting for Civil Rights. It’s a picture book called The Youngest Marcher: The Story of Audrey Faye Hendricks, a Young Civil Rights Activist.

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We’ve Got a Job: The 1963 Birmingham Children’s March written by Cynthia Levinson 2013 Awardee

We Shall Overcome: The Story of a Song written by Debbie Levy and illustrated by Vanessa Brantley-Newton 2014 Awardee


Obituary: Marilyn Sachs

Sachs credits her desire to avoid bullying, and a rich family history of storytellers, as catalysts for developing a talent for “rearranging the truth” and telling tales.

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The Big Book for Peace edited by Ann Durell and Marilyn Sachs 1991 Awardee

A Pocket Full of Seeds written by Marilyn Sachs 1974 Awardee


Kerry James Marshall and Faith Ringgold Receive CAA Awards for Distinction

The College Art Association (CAA) has announced the recipients of the 2017 Awards for Distinction, which celebrates the achievements of artists, art historians, authors, conservators, curators, and critics whose work has an impact both in their professional fields and the art world at large.

Kerry James Marshall is the recipient of the 2017 CAA Artist Award for Distinguished Body of Work, while Faith Ringgold is the winner of the 2017 CAA Distinguished Artist Award for Lifetime Achievement.

Ringgold, who is widely considered one of the most influential living African American artists, has been awarded for her multidisciplinary work, comprising painting, quilts, sculpture, performance, and children’s books, which explores Civil Rights, racial justice, feminism, and art history.

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Aunt Harriet’s Underground Railroad in the Sky by Faith Ringgold 1993 Awardee


Kirsten Greenidge on adapting the beloved Bud, Not Buddy for the stage

When Christopher Paul Curtis wrote the children’s book, Bud, Not Buddy, in 1999 it quickly became a darling among book critics and beloved by families everywhere. The cherished book won two prestigious awards: the 2000 John Newbery Medal for Excellence in Children’s Literature and the Coretta Scott King Award.

“It could all sound very bleak and if you take all the little things that happen to him, it sounds awful, but I hope people find there is a lot of inspiration in this little boy’s story. He never gives up and he find the good in people, and the people he meets, finds the humanity in him.”

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Elijah of Buxton by Christopher Paul Curtis 2008 Awardee

The Watsons Go to Birmingham - 1963 by Christopher Paul Curtis 1996 Awardee


Abbot Library to host Poetry Salon

The Abbot Public Library will host a Poetry Salon about Lucille Clifton from 2 to 4 p.m. Jan. 22 at the library, 235 Pleasant St., Marblehead.

She is noted for saying much with few words. Poet Robin Becker commented on Clifton’s lean style: “Clifton’s poetics of understatement - no capitalization, few strong stresses per line, many poems totaling fewer than 20 lines, the sharp rhetorical question - includes the essential only.” For Clifton, writing was “a way of continuing to hope … perhaps, for me, it is a way of remembering I am not alone.”

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Amifika written by Lucille Clifton 1978 Awardee


On this day, the ground convulsed in Haiti, killing thousands

Renowned Haitian-American author Edwidge Danticat dedicated a memorial wall in honor of those killed during the quake’s 35 seconds. “We would need never-ending walls to write all of the names,” Danticat said during the ceremony. “We are here remembering the faces, the smiles, the hopes, the dreams of each and every one of those who died seven years ago and what they meant to those who loved them.”

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Mama’s Nightingale: A Story of Immigration and Separation written by Edwidge Danticat 2016 Awardee

Since 1953, the Jane Addams Children’s Book Award annually acknowledges books published in the U.S. during the previous year. Books commended by the Award address themes of topics that engage children in thinking about peace, justice, world community and/or equality of the sexes and all races. The books also must meet conventional standards of literacy and artistic excellence.

A national committee chooses winners and honor books for younger and older children.

Read more about the 2016 Awards.


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