Jane Addams Peace Association News

Award recognizes excellence in children’s books that portray Latin American culture

Two children’s book authors have been awarded the 2016 Amricas Award for Children’s and Young Adult Literature, coordinated by Vanderbilt University’s Center for Latin American Studies and Tulane University.

This year’s recipients, Pam Muoz Ryan, author of Echo, and Ashley Hope-Perez, author of Out of Darkness, were honored Sept. 22 at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C.

Award decisions center on four main criteria: distinctive literary quality; how accurately it represents Latin culture; exceptional integration of text, illustration and design; and potential for classroom use.

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Esperanza Rising written by Pam Muoz Ryan 2001 Awardee


Datebook: ‘Elizabeth Catlett & Benny Andrews’ at Hemphill Fine Arts, Washington D.C

The exhibition presents the paintings of Benny Andrews (1930-2006) and sculptures by Elizabeth Catlett (1915-2012). [B]oth individually asserted the validity of their own lives and the humanity around them, communicating a spiritual dignity that still resonates in today’s world.both individually asserted the validity of their own lives and the humanity around them, communicating a spiritual dignity that still resonates in today’s world.

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Delivering Justice: W. W. Law and the Fight for Civil Rights, written by Jim Haskins, illustrated by Benny Andrews 2006 Awardee


Banned Books Week, a new Deborah Hopkinson book

Oregon author Deborah Hopkinson’s latest book for children focuses on World War II’s Pacific theater.

Sailors and submarines: Oregon children’s author Deborah Hopkinson has a new nonfiction book aimed at elementary and middle schoolers: “Dive! World War II Stories of Sailors & Submarines in the Pacific” (Scholastic Press, 384 pages, $17.99). Hopkinson notes that this December is the 75th anniversary of Japan’s attack on the United States’ Pearl Harbor naval base in Hawaii. The book comes out Sept. 27.

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Girl Wonder: A Baseball Story in Nine Innings by Deborah Hopkinson, illustrated by Terry Wideners, 2004 Awardee

Shutting Out the Sky: Life in the Tenements of New York 1880-1924 by Deborah Hopkinson 2004 Awardee

A Band of Angels: A Story Inspired written by the Jubilee Singers by Deborah Hopkinson, illustrated by Ral Coln, 2000 Awardee


In Conversation: Meet Children’s Book Author-Illustrator Ral Coln

This Spanish-language program takes place Friday, September 23 from 5:00 to 7:00 p.m. at the Bank Street College Library. The first special guest is two-time Pura Belpr winner Ral Coln, and the event features Ral’s books “Draw!,” “Hillary,” “Fearless Flyer: Ruth Law and Her Flying Machine,” and “Solving the Puzzle Under the Sea: Marie Tharp Maps the Ocean Floor.”

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A Band of Angels: A Story Inspired written by the Jubilee Singers by Deborah Hopkinson, illustrated by Ral Coln, 2000 Awardee


Joliet students learn about life in Africa

Fifth-grade students at Carl Sandburg Elementary School experienced in real life Thursday what they had been reading in a book that talks about life in the Sudan. Students were split into several groups. One group went to get water at a small pool and bring it back, another worked with plants, and another group put towels on their head to balance water.

The activities were part of the students reading “A Long Walk to Water” by Linda Sue Park and learning about Africa as part of their social studies unit.

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A Long Walk to Water: Based on a True Story by Linda Sue Park 2011 Awardee

When My Name Was Keoko by Linda Sue Park 2003 Awardee


Literary stars shine at Brooklyn Book Festival 2016

Jacqueline Woodson, author of more than two dozen books including “Brown Girl Dreaming,” her memoir, was awarded the festival’s Best of Brooklyn (BoBi) Award.

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Each Kindness written by Jacqueline Woodson, illustrated by E.B. Lewis 2013 Awardee

From the Notebooks of Melanin Sun by Jacqueline Woodson 1996 Awardee

I Hadn’t Meant to Tell You This by Jacqueline Woodson 1995 Awardee


Kirkus Prize Finalists Announced

“Thunder Boy Jr.,” a picture book by Alexie and illustrator Yuyi Morales, is a nominee for children’s books announced Tuesday, Sept. 20, 2016, for a Kirkus Prize.

Kirkus, the book industry trade publication, also announced six finalists each for $50,000 prizes in nonfiction and children’s literature. Like the National Book Awards, many of the Kirkus picks have themes of race and social justice.

Winners will be announced Nov. 3.

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Harvesting Hope: The Story of Cesar Chavez, written by Kathleen Krull, illustrated by Yuyi Morales 2004 Awardee


To help Afghan schoolgirls, Seattle children raise funds

Maxime Johnstone was 7 years old when she researched the struggle young girls in Afghanistan face getting an education. To help, the Seattle girl went without birthday presents and instead asked her friends to fundraise.

Now, roughly two years later, Maxime has rallied her friends to keep the effort going, raising money periodically with lemonade stands and other homegrown sales to benefit the Razia’s Ray of Hope Foundation. The nonprofit runs a school outside of Kabul that provides free education for hundreds of Afghan girls.

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Razia’s Ray of Hope: One Girl’s Dream of an Education written by Elizabeth Suneby and illustrated by Suana Verelst 2014 Awardee


Margarita Engle and Susan Tan team up at the 2017 Midwinter Meeting

Award-winning children’s book authors Susan Tan and Margarita Engle will team up on Saturday, January 21st in the Auditorium Speakers Series at the 2017 American Library Association’s Midwinter Meeting and Exhibits in Atlanta, Georgia to discuss diversity in children’s books and women authors.

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Silver People: Voices from the Panama Canal by Margarita Engle 2015 Awardee

The Surrender Tree: Poems of Cuba’s Struggle for Freedom, written by Margarita Engle 2009 Awardee


2016 Ceremony Invitation

Join us for a memorable afternoon of award presentations and responses by authors and illustrators. Come meet and talk with the honored guests, including Award winners and honorees. Enjoy a reception and an opportunity for book signing after formal presentation of the awards. All the award books will be available for purchase. This event is free and open to all. Reservations are not needed. Please come and enjoy!

Ceremony Invitation: JPG | PDF

Since 1953, the Jane Addams Children’s Book Award annually acknowledges books published in the U.S. during the previous year. Books commended by the Award address themes of topics that engage children in thinking about peace, justice, world community and/or equality of the sexes and all races. The books also must meet conventional standards of literacy and artistic excellence.

A national committee chooses winners and honor books for younger and older children.

Click here to read more about the 2016 Awards.

Podcast #129: Edwidge Danticat on Silence, Bridging Audiences, and Participating in Stories

Edwidge Danticat is a MacArthur Fellow “Genius Grant” recipient and author, best known for her book Brother, I’m Dying. In 2010, she visited the Library to talk about her essay collection Create Dangerously: The Immigrant Artist at Work. For this week’s episode of the New York Public Library Podcast, we’re proud to present Edwidge Danticat discussing silence, bridging audiences, and participating in stories.

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Mama’s Nightingale: A Story of Immigration and Separation written by Edwidge Danticat, illustrated by Leslie Staub 2016 Awardee


Podcast: Katherine Paterson

Former National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature Katherine Paterson is the newest in our series of National Book Festival author podcasts. Karen Jaffee talks to Paterson about the author’s new memoir, “Stories of My Life.”

The 2016 Library of Congress National Book Festival, which is free for everyone, will be held at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center on Saturday, Sept. 24, from 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. Katherine Paterson will appear on the History & Biography stage, sponsored by Wells Fargo, as well as participate in the evening Books to Movies presentation.

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The Same Stuff as Stars by Katherine Paterson 2003 Awardee

The Great Gilly Hopkins by Katherine Paterson 1979 Awardee


The Longlist for the National Book Awards
The contenders include a debut novelist and a previous winner.

The National Book Foundation announced Thursday its longlist of 10 titles in the running for the National Book Award for fiction, which celebrates the best in American literature over the past year.

Jacqueline Woodson, who previously won in the Young People’s Literature category for her 2014 memoir Brown Girl Dreaming, this time longlisted for her novel Another Brooklyn.

The finalists will be revealed October 13, with the winners to be announced at a ceremony in New York on November 16.

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Each Kindness written by Jacqueline Woodson, illustrated by E.B. Lewis 2013 Awardee

From the Notebooks of Melanin Sun by Jacqueline Woodson 1996 Awardee

I Hadn’t Meant to Tell You This by Jacqueline Woodson 1995 Awardee


Black-owned Travel Sites of Today Reflect Black Guidebook of the Past

The founders of the new app Noirbnb note their link to history: a publication known as the Green Book, printed between the years of 1936 and 1966, when travel for African Americans was difficult and unwelcoming in many parts of the United States.

“Many people have said, ‘We had no idea this existed. We kind of wish we had this book today.’ We hear that a lot,” says Becky Wible Searles, an animation professor with the Savannah College of Art and Design’s Atlanta campus. She and author Calvin Alexander Ramsey are working on a documentary film about the guide compiled annually by postal worker Victor Hugo Green until his death in 1960.

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Belle, the Last Mule at Gee’s Bend written by Calvin Alexander Ramsey and Bettye Stroud, illustrated by John Holyfield 2012 Awardee

Ruth and the Green Book by Calvin Alexander Ramsey with Gwen Strauss and illustrated by Floyd Cooper 2011 Awardee


Vietnam: A History of the War by Russell Freedman | SLJ Review

In his customary well-honed prose, Freedman presents a coherent overview of the Vietnam War. Freedman’s account leans toward the view that the carnage resulted from a perfect storm of missed opportunities for alliances or political solutions, misunderstood history and culture, wrongheaded strategic decisions, and mulish pride on the part of U.S. political and military leaders.
Holiday House. Oct. 2016.

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Freedom Walkers, written by Russell Freedman 2007 Awardee

Kids at Work: Lewis Hine and the Crusade Against Child Labor written by Russell Freedman 1995 Awardee

Eleanor Roosevelt: A Life of Discovery written by Russell Freedman 1994 Awardee


World Beyond War 2016 conference

The World Beyond War 2016 conference, sponsored in part through the Jane Addams Peace Association’s Disarmament Fund, is planning a big event in Washington, D.C., in September 2016, just after the International Day of Peace, including a conference on Friday September 23 through Sunday September 25. They are also working with the National Campaign for Nonviolent Resistance (NCNR) which is planning a nonviolent activism training and planning session on the 25th and a nonviolent action in D.C. on Monday morning September 26th, with support from Campaign Nonviolence.

Speakers will include: Dennis Kucinich, Kathy Kelly, Miriam Pemberton, David Vine, Kozue Akibayashi, Harvey Wasserman, Jeff Bachman, Peter Kuznick, Medea Benjamin, Maurice Carney, David Swanson, Leah Bolger, David Hartsough, Pat Elder, John Dear, Mel Duncan, Kimberley Phillips, Ira Helfand, Darakshan Raja, Bill Fletcher Jr., Lindsey German, Maria Santelli, Mark Engler, Maja Groff, Robert Fantina, Barbara Wien, Jodie Evans, Odile Hugonot Haber, Gar Alperovitz, Sam Husseini, Christopher Simpson, Brenna Gautam, Patrick Hiller, Mubarak Awad, Michelle Kwak, John Washburn, Bruce Gagnon, David Cortright, Michael McPhearson, Sharon Tennison, Gareth Porter, John Reuwer, Pat Alviso, Larry Wilkerson, Thomas Drake, Larry Johnson, John Kiriakou, Craig Murray, Raed Jarrar, Alli McCracken, Lilly Daigle, and Alice Slater. Speakers’ bios and photos: worldbeyondwar.org/nowar2016speakers???

World Beyond War is a global nonviolent movement to end war and establish a just and sustainable peace.??

Join us to learn about and engage in working on viable alternatives to war and militarism.

The next application deadline for the JAPA Disarmament Fund is September 30, 2016.

Learn More and Check Out the Flyer


2016 Ceremony Invitation

Join us for a memorable afternoon of award presentations and responses by authors and illustrators. Come meet and talk with the honored guests, including Award winners and honorees. Enjoy a reception and an opportunity for book signing after formal presentation of the awards. All the award books will be available for purchase. This event is free and open to all. Reservations are not needed. Please come and enjoy!

Ceremony Invitation: JPG | PDF

Since 1953, the Jane Addams Children’s Book Award annually acknowledges books published in the U.S. during the previous year. Books commended by the Award address themes of topics that engage children in thinking about peace, justice, world community and/or equality of the sexes and all races. The books also must meet conventional standards of literacy and artistic excellence.

A national committee chooses winners and honor books for younger and older children.

Click here to read more about the 2016 Awards.

Engle to receive Lee Bennett Hopkins Poetry Award Sept. 20
Verse memoir by Cuban-American author contrasts her two worlds

Margarita Engle, 2016 winner of the Lee Bennett Hopkins Poetry Award, will receive the national children’s poetry honor at 4 p.m. on Tuesday, Sept. 20, in Foster Auditorium, 102 Paterno Library, on Penn State’s University Park campus. Following the award presentation,

Engle will speak about her writing, specifically the use of historical works to communicate with children, and show photos from Cuba to illustrate scenes from her winning verse memoir, “Enchanted Air: Two Cultures, Two Wings.”

The Lee Bennett Hopkins Poetry Award is named for the internationally renowned educator, poet, anthologist, and passionate advocate of poetry for young people. Established in 1993, the award is presented annually to an American poet or anthologist for the most outstanding new book of poetry for children published in the previous calendar year.

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Silver People: Voices from the Panama Canal by Margarita Engle 2015 Awardee

The Surrender Tree: Poems of Cuba’s Struggle for Freedom, written by Margarita Engle 2009 Awardee


White House Committee Names Five Student Poets For Prestigious National Student Poets Program

The fifth annual class of the National Student Poets Program (NSPP)-the nation’s highest honor for youth poets- has been announced by the President’s Committee on the Arts and the Humanities (PCAH) in partnership with the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) and the nonprofit Alliance for Young Artists & Writers.

All student works in consideration for the National Student Poets Program are judged based on exceptional creativity, dedication to craft, and promise by a jury of luminaries and leaders in education and the arts. This year’s panel of judges included Kwame Alexander (Newbery Medal-winning poet), Jennifer Benka (author and executive director of the Academy of American poets), Michael Earl Craig (Montana State Poet Laureate), Toi Derricotte (professor of writing at the University of Pittsburgh), Edward Hirsch (President of the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation), Naomi Shihab Nye (acclaimed poet and Academy of American Poets Chancellor) and Alice Quinn (executive director of the Poetry Society of America).

“Hearing the Class of 2015 National Student Poets perform their collaborative poem at the Chancellor Conversations was one of the highlights of the 2015 Academy of American Poets’ Poets Forum. It was amazing to read all these great voices during the selection process. The young poets’ works are stunning, smart, sophisticated, deeply woven and wondrous… They are haunting, thoughtful, surprising; their verve and vitality convey important subject matter. Truly I love them all!” ? Naomi Shihab Nye, award-winning poet and recipient of the 2013 NSK Neustadt Prize for Children’s Literature

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Habibi written by Naomi Shihab Nye 1998 Awardee


Oscar-Nominated Cartoon Saloon, Angelina Jolie Pitt Team With WestEnd on ‘The Breadwinner’ (EXCLUSIVE)

International sales agent and financier WestEnd Films has teamed up once again with Irish studio Cartoon Saloon following their successful partnership on Oscar-nominated animated movie “Song of the Sea.” This time they are working together on “The Breadwinner,” which is produced in association with Angelina Jolie Pitt’s Jolie Pas Prods. WestEnd will be introducing the film to buyers in Toronto.

“The Breadwinner” centers on a young Afghan girl who cuts her hair and disguises herself as a boy in order to support her family after the Taliban imprison her father. It is based on Deborah Ellis’ novel, which has sold 2.5 million copies worldwide across 25 languages. Ellis wrote the film’s screenplay with Anita Doron.

The film is directed by Nora Twomey, co-director of animated-feature Oscar-nominee “The Secret of Kells.”

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The Heaven Shop, by Deborah Ellis 2005 Awardee

The Breadwinner Trilogy, three books by Deborah Ellis 2004 Awardee

Parvana’s Journey written by Deborah Ellis 2003 Awardee


UNM Press Author Francisco Jimnez to receive John Steinbeck Award

Francisco Jimnez, author of the bestselling UNM Press book The Circuit: Stories from the Life of a Migrant Child, will receive the John Steinbeck Award on Wednesday, Sept. 28 at San Jos State University.

The John Steinbeck Award is offered to artists and activists whose work exemplifies the spirit of Steinbeck’s social engagement. Endorsed by the Steinbeck estate, the award is presented by the Martha Heasley Cox Center for Steinbeck Studies at SJSU.

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The Circuit: Stories from the Life of a Migrant Child written by Francisco Jimnez 1998 Awardee


Imagination Library Carnival offers fun in reading education for kids of all ages

Each year, the Imagination Library Board brings a featured children’s author to Mountain City to regale audiences with short stories and anecdotes of days gone by. This year’s featured author was Carmen Agra Deedy. She has authored a variety of children’s books and is known nationwide for her talented storytelling being featured on nationally syndicated programs such as All Things Considered on NPR.

Heritage Hall echoed with roars of laughter as Deedy brought her storytelling talent to the local stage for five performances over two days. Children and parents alike were enthralled as Deedy shared stories of growing up in Cuba and the beginning of her school days in Decatur, Georgia.

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The Yellow Star: The Legend of King Christian X of Denmark written by Carmen Agra Deedy 2001 Awardee


Millbrook Press Announces Four New Picture Books from Jane Yolen, Michele Wood, and Other Outstanding Authors and Illustrators

Like a Bird: The Art of the American Slave Song brings together iconic African American spirituals and stunning illustrations by Coretta Scott King Award-winning illustrator Michele Wood.

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i see the rhythm written by Toyomi Igus, illustrated by Michele Wood 1999 Awardee


'The Fire This Time’ Is The Book We Need In The Age Of #BlackLivesMatter

The Fire This Time: A New Generation Speaks Out On Race hopes to serve as both a proof of collective memory and a healing salve. The collection, which includes essays, poems, and letters by contributors such as Kima Jones, Kiese Laymon, Edwidge Danticat, and Claudia Rankine, attempts to make sense of the contradictions of a country that seems to deny the sins of the past while simultaneously repeating them.

In the collection’s final essay, “Message to My Daughters,” Edwidge Danticat uses Baldwin’s “My Dungeon Shook” as a guide. Danticat’s letter is equal parts hope and despair. She doesn’t want her daughters to grow into self-hating cynics or feel that their blackness is a weakness. She wants her daughters, as Baldwin said, “To decide who you are, and force the world to deal with you, not with its idea of you.”

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Mama’s Nightingale: A Story of Immigration and Separation written by Edwidge Danticat, illustrated by Leslie Staub 2016 Awardee


World Beyond War 2016 conference

The World Beyond War 2016 conference, sponsored in part through the Jane Addams Peace Association’s Disarmament Fund, is planning a big event in Washington, D.C., in September 2016, just after the International Day of Peace, including a conference on Friday September 23 through Sunday September 25. They are also working with the National Campaign for Nonviolent Resistance (NCNR) which is planning a nonviolent activism training and planning session on the 25th and a nonviolent action in D.C. on Monday morning September 26th, with support from Campaign Nonviolence.

Speakers will include: Dennis Kucinich, Kathy Kelly, Miriam Pemberton, David Vine, Kozue Akibayashi, Harvey Wasserman, Jeff Bachman, Peter Kuznick, Medea Benjamin, Maurice Carney, David Swanson, Leah Bolger, David Hartsough, Pat Elder, John Dear, Mel Duncan, Kimberley Phillips, Ira Helfand, Darakshan Raja, Bill Fletcher Jr., Lindsey German, Maria Santelli, Mark Engler, Maja Groff, Robert Fantina, Barbara Wien, Jodie Evans, Odile Hugonot Haber, Gar Alperovitz, Sam Husseini, Christopher Simpson, Brenna Gautam, Patrick Hiller, Mubarak Awad, Michelle Kwak, John Washburn, Bruce Gagnon, David Cortright, Michael McPhearson, Sharon Tennison, Gareth Porter, John Reuwer, Pat Alviso, Larry Wilkerson, Thomas Drake, Larry Johnson, John Kiriakou, Craig Murray, Raed Jarrar, Alli McCracken, Lilly Daigle, and Alice Slater. Speakers’ bios and photos: worldbeyondwar.org/nowar2016speakers???

World Beyond War is a global nonviolent movement to end war and establish a just and sustainable peace.??

Join us to learn about and engage in working on viable alternatives to war and militarism.

The next application deadline for the JAPA Disarmament Fund is September 30, 2016.

Learn More and Check Out the Flyer


2016 Ceremony Invitation

Join us for a memorable afternoon of award presentations and responses by authors and illustrators. Come meet and talk with the honored guests, including Award winners and honorees. Enjoy a reception and an opportunity for book signing after formal presentation of the awards. All the award books will be available for purchase. This event is free and open to all. Reservations are not needed. Please come and enjoy!

Ceremony Invitation: JPG | PDF

Since 1953, the Jane Addams Children’s Book Award annually acknowledges books published in the U.S. during the previous year. Books commended by the Award address themes of topics that engage children in thinking about peace, justice, world community and/or equality of the sexes and all races. The books also must meet conventional standards of literacy and artistic excellence.

A national committee chooses winners and honor books for younger and older children.

Click here to read more about the 2016 Awards.

Theatre: At Intiman, a timely story about an interracial couple - set in the 1918 South

“Wedding Band,” by Alice Childress, profiles an interracial couple in 1918 South Carolina, but its message is still timely. The play closes Intiman Theatre Festival’s seasonlong salute to black women playwrights. A Charleston, S.C., native, and great-granddaughter of slaves, Childress was keenly attuned to the civil-rights and feminist movements, and one of the first black women playwrights to win national recognition.

Her well-read novel for young people, “A Hero Ain’t Nothin’ But a Sandwich,” about a 13-year-old heroin addict, became part of a 1982 Supreme Court case after a New York school district censored it and other books. Such reactions just proved to Childress that she was casting light on meaningful social issues that needed to be openly considered and addressed.

“Writing is a labor of love and also an act of defiance,” she once wrote, “a way to light a candle in a gale wind.”

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A Hero Ain’t Nothin’ But a Sandwich by Alice Childress 1974 Awardee


Books to give you hope: Z for Zachariah by Robert C O'Brien

This is a hard ending for a young reader to accept ? and Ann herself struggles with the “childishness” of her need for fairness, in a book that is fascinated, like much of the best YA, with the threshold between childhood and adulthood (her formal references to “Mr Loomis” throughout signal the age difference between them, as well as her need to keep him at arm’s length).

Decades later, though, Ann’s decision to step from her bounded Eden into the ominous wasteland outside reads as a testament to the power of choosing hope over surrender.

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Z for Zachariah by Robert C O'Brien 1976 Awardee


Lois Lowry on ‘The Giver’ and what she regrets in her new book, 'Looking Back’

“I disagree with you about one thing. I don’t think we’re on our own. We’re made up of all the people who have been part of our lives.” And of course that’s true - all those people have become part of us. If I were to redo this book again, maybe I would leave that part out.

Lois Lowry will be at the National Book Festival, Sept. 24, at the Washington Convention Center.

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Number the Stars written by Lois Lowry 1990 Awardee


Painting a vibrant picture of Brooklyn in the tumultuous 1970s

JEFFREY BROWN: The Bushwick of the 1970s that Woodson describes had more than its share of problems and dangers, especially for young girls. Drugs were everywhere. White flight was well under way. But she also recalls a vibrant place, with young people, like her characters, who aspired to and achieved great things.

JACQUELINE WOODSON: It was very much alive, and I wanted to capture that, especially given how people think of Bushwick as this place that’s newly discovered. And every time I hear that, I’m just like, no, there were people here before then.

JEFFREY BROWN: Do you fear that that history has been lost? Is that part of what is going on here?

JACQUELINE WOODSON: Yes, I think it can get lost. But I think writers are the history keepers, right? We’re the ones who are bearing witness to what’s going on in the world. And I feel like it’s our job to put that down on paper, and put it out into the world, so that it can be remembered.

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Each Kindness written by Jacqueline Woodson, illustrated by E.B. Lewis 2013 Awardee

From the Notebooks of Melanin Sun by Jacqueline Woodson 1996 Awardee

I Hadn’t Meant to Tell You This by Jacqueline Woodson 1995 Awardee


10 questions for author Jacqueline Woodson

Why stop at the Decatur Book Festival? It’s part of my book tour. The South tends to get ignored sometimes, but Another Brooklyn does start in Tennessee.

What are you working on next? Right now I am working on an essay about when I was in Israel/Palestine a couple months ago. It’s for an anthology coming out to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Six-Day War. Michael Chabon and Ayelet Waldman are editing it. I’m still figuring out the topic of my essay.

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Each Kindness written by Jacqueline Woodson, illustrated by E.B. Lewis 2013 Awardee

From the Notebooks of Melanin Sun by Jacqueline Woodson 1996 Awardee

I Hadn’t Meant to Tell You This by Jacqueline Woodson 1995 Awardee


Brooklyn Book Festival to present 'Best of Brooklyn’ Award to Jacqueline Woodson

The festival, which is New York City’s largest free public literary event, each year pays tribute to an author whose work exemplifies or speaks to the spirit of the festival’s hometown, Brooklyn. In addition to honoring Woodson, the festival is recognizing three more of Brooklyn’s own-Andrea Davis Pinkney, Ben Katchor and Bernice McFadden - with collectible bookmarks that will be available in library branches and select bookstores.

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Each Kindness written by Jacqueline Woodson, illustrated by E.B. Lewis 2013 Awardee

From the Notebooks of Melanin Sun by Jacqueline Woodson 1996 Awardee

I Hadn’t Meant to Tell You This by Jacqueline Woodson 1995 Awardee

Sit-In: How Four Friends Stood Up by Sitting Down by Andrea Davis Pinkney, illustrated by Brian Pinkney 2011 Awardee

Sojourner Truth’s Step-Stomp Stride, by Andrea Davis Pinkney & Brian Pinkney 2010 Awardee


Pratt Presents Acclaimed Artist and Alumnus Kadir Nelson in Conversation on September 17

Pratt Presents, the Institute’s signature series of public programs, will present a Creative Conversation featuring award-winning American author, artist, and Pratt alumnus Kadir Nelson (B.F.A. Communications Design '96) on Saturday, September 17, on the Brooklyn campus.

The artist and author will talk about his creative inspirations, work, and latest projects with Anita Cooney, dean of Pratt’s School of Design, followed by a book signing. This special event is free and open to the public, and will be a highlight of Pratt’s Alumni Day and Reunion 2016.

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The Village That Vanished written by Ann Grifalconi and illustrated by Kadir Nelson 2003 Awardee

Heart and Soul: The Story of America and African Americans written and illustrated by Kadir Nelson 2012 Awardee


Heartland Film Honors “The Great Gilly Hopkins” with Truly Moving Picture Award

The family drama “The Great Gilly Hopkins,” directed by Stephen Herek and based on the award-winning young-adult novel by Katherine Paterson (“Bridge to Terabithia”), has been honored with the Truly Moving Picture Award from the nonprofit arts organization Heartland Film. Select films - entertaining movies that do more than just entertain - receive the designation throughout the year.

“As an author, one of my primary motivations is to truly move the reader, and to have people really connect on an emotional level with my books,” said Paterson. “For our film adaptation of 'The Great Gilly Hopkins’ to have received the Truly Moving Picture Award says to me that we have successfully translated that same level of emotional connection to the big screen. We are truly honored.”

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The Same Stuff as Stars by Katherine Paterson 2003 Awardee

The Great Gilly Hopkins by Katherine Paterson 1979 Awardee


ISEM under the sea ? The 2016 Common Read explores consciousness through the eyes of marine invertebrates

When Carol Spurling, the co-owner of BookPeople of Moscow, suggested Montgomery’s latest book to the University of Idaho Common Read Committee, the committee composed of students, faculty and community members decided to name it the 2016 Common Read.

While integrating a pre-determined book into a class that may be unrelated to the Common Read selection is a challenge, Bird said he has found that it allows instructors to be creative and make connections in new places. “For example, Bill Loftus is teaching ISEM about climate change,” Bird said. “He’s going to talk about how the changes in ocean temperatures are affecting marine life.”

Another professor, Tom Drake, intends to connect the emotional sensitivity of octopuses with his ISEM course, Love and Happiness. “Tom and Sy have this great dialogue about happiness and how do octopuses fall in love and how would you know if an octopus is happy,” Bird said. “How does an octopus, through her tentacles, tell whether the human she’s relating to is scared or content or accepting? So every instructor has a different approach.”

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Temple Grandin: How the Girl Who Loved Cows Embraced Autism and Changed the World by Sy Montgomery 2013 Awardee


Have We Got a Story For You! [AD WALL]

A lot is happening in children’s writing in India. While old guards continue their good work, a look at a handful of authors writing for different age brackets, who are consistently coming up with discerning, and different, work. When she finally began to write, Perkins found herself invariably writing about children caught between cultures.

Her characters are almost always south Asian (Indian, Bangladeshi, Burmese, to cite a few) and Perkins weaves in contemporary socio-political references to her narratives to set the choices and outcomes of her characters in context.

What helped her along was an authorial epiphany - the realisation that “writing for children is not really that different than writing for adults. The entire process of writing is challenging. You have to be willing to take risks, face rejection, and master revision (be willing to change every word) - I call them the three 'Rs’ of becoming a published author.” The realisation freed her from her addressing a set target audience. “I write for children. But mostly, I write stories for myself,” she says.

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Rickshaw Girl by Mitali Perkins, illustrations by Jamie Hogan 2008 Awardee


World Beyond War 2016 conference

The World Beyond War 2016 conference, sponsored in part through the Jane Addams Peace Association’s Disarmament Fund, is planning a big event in Washington, D.C., in September 2016, just after the International Day of Peace, including a conference on Friday September 23 through Sunday September 25. They are also working with the National Campaign for Nonviolent Resistance (NCNR) which is planning a nonviolent activism training and planning session on the 25th and a nonviolent action in D.C. on Monday morning September 26th, with support from Campaign Nonviolence.

Speakers will include: Dennis Kucinich, Kathy Kelly, Miriam Pemberton, David Vine, Kozue Akibayashi, Harvey Wasserman, Jeff Bachman, Peter Kuznick, Medea Benjamin, Maurice Carney, David Swanson, Leah Bolger, David Hartsough, Pat Elder, John Dear, Mel Duncan, Kimberley Phillips, Ira Helfand, Darakshan Raja, Bill Fletcher Jr., Lindsey German, Maria Santelli, Mark Engler, Maja Groff, Robert Fantina, Barbara Wien, Jodie Evans, Odile Hugonot Haber, Gar Alperovitz, Sam Husseini, Christopher Simpson, Brenna Gautam, Patrick Hiller, Mubarak Awad, Michelle Kwak, John Washburn, Bruce Gagnon, David Cortright, Michael McPhearson, Sharon Tennison, Gareth Porter, John Reuwer, Pat Alviso, Larry Wilkerson, Thomas Drake, Larry Johnson, John Kiriakou, Craig Murray, Raed Jarrar, Alli McCracken, Lilly Daigle, and Alice Slater. Speakers’ bios and photos: worldbeyondwar.org/nowar2016speakers???

World Beyond War is a global nonviolent movement to end war and establish a just and sustainable peace.??

Join us to learn about and engage in working on viable alternatives to war and militarism.

The next application deadline for the JAPA Disarmament Fund is September 30, 2016.

Learn More and Check Out the Flyer


2016 Ceremony Invitation

Join us for a memorable afternoon of award presentations and responses by authors and illustrators. Come meet and talk with the honored guests, including Award winners and honorees. Enjoy a reception and an opportunity for book signing after formal presentation of the awards. All the award books will be available for purchase. This event is free and open to all. Reservations are not needed. Please come and enjoy!

Ceremony Invitation: JPG | PDF

Since 1953, the Jane Addams Children’s Book Award annually acknowledges books published in the U.S. during the previous year. Books commended by the Award address themes of topics that engage children in thinking about peace, justice, world community and/or equality of the sexes and all races. The books also must meet conventional standards of literacy and artistic excellence.

A national committee chooses winners and honor books for younger and older children.

Click here to read more about the 2016 Awards.

Two New Novels Succeed in Telling the Story of 9/11 to Kids

In Towers Falling, Jewell Parker Rhodes brings the narrative closer to Dja’s home in the tale of her father, who suffers from a mysterious ailment. He’s never acknowledged that his chain of joblessness began with the attacks. It’s a welcome exploration of the long-ranging costs of 9/11.

Read More

Sugar by Jewell Parker Rhodes 2014 Awardee

The Ninth Ward by Jewell Parker Rhodes 2011 Awardee


Jaqueline Woodson reading a poem about a Brooklyn neighborhood

This month Jaqueline Woodson released her first novel for adults in many years, and has been talking about the history of Bushwick, the setting for Another Brooklyn.

Read More

Jacqueline Woodson: By the Book

Tell us about your favorite picture books. And your favorite novels for children?

One of my favorite picture books of all time is “The Little Match Girl,” by Hans Christian Andersen. When I was first introduced to that book as a child, I feel like I cried for a week. Then I was done and ready to go out and change the world! It was the first book that unlocked empathy in me. I also love John Steptoe’s “Stevie.” It was the first book I read where characters talked and looked like the people I loved. I think no one should leave young adulthood without reading Rita Williams-Garcia’s “One Crazy Summer”; Thanhha Lai’s “Listen, Slowly”; Naomi Shihab Nye’s “Habibi”; and Sherman Alexie’s “The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian.”

Read More

Young People’s Poet Laureate Jacqueline Woodson Coming to DePauw Sept. 29

Woodson was also the recipient of the Margaret A. Edwards Award for lifetime achievement for her contributions to young adult literature, the winner of the Jane Addams Children’s Book Award, and was the 2013 United States nominee for the Hans Christian Andersen Award.

The goal of Banned Books Week is to bring attention to books that have been banned, ranging from To Kill a Mockingbird to The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.

Woodson will speak on Thursday, September 29, at 7 p.m. in Thompson Recital Hall, located within DePauw’s Green Center for the Performing Arts. Woodson will be available to sign books after the event, which is being presented as part of Banned Books Week.

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Each Kindness written by Jacqueline Woodson, illustrated by E.B. Lewis 2013 Awardee

From the Notebooks of Melanin Sun by Jacqueline Woodson 1996 Awardee

I Hadn’t Meant to Tell You This by Jacqueline Woodson 1995 Awardee


FSU’s Weatherford honored for book

Carole Boston Weatherford, a professor of English at Fayetteville State University, has received the 2016 Boston Globe-Horn Book Award, it was announced Friday.

Weatherford won for her book “Voice of Freedom: Fannie Lou Hamer, Spirit of the Civil Rights Movement.”

Weatherford’s book, “Gordon Parks: How the Photographer Captured Black and White America,” recently won the NAACP Image Award for children’s literature.

Read More

Birmingham, 1963 by Carole Boston Weatherford 2008 Awardee


Louise Erdrich and ‘La Rose,’ Sunday on KCTS Channel 9 [VIDEO]

In a video excerpt, Erdrich discusses her favorite character in the novel, and the cycle of revenge and violence in which she becomes enmeshed.

Watch the Interview

The Birchbark House by Louise Erdrich 2000 Awardee


UPI Almanac for Thursday, Aug. 25, 2016

On this date in history:

In 1985, Samantha Smith, 13, was killed with her father and six other people in a plane crash in Maine. Samantha’s 1983 letter to Soviet President Yuri Andropov about her fear of nuclear war earned her a visit to the Soviet Union.

Read More

Journey to the Soviet Union by Samantha Smith 1986 Awardee


World Beyond War 2016 conference

The World Beyond War 2016 conference, sponsored in part through the Jane Addams Peace Association’s Disarmament Fund, is planning a big event in Washington, D.C., in September 2016, just after the International Day of Peace, including a conference on Friday September 23 through Sunday September 25. They are also working with the National Campaign for Nonviolent Resistance (NCNR) which is planning a nonviolent activism training and planning session on the 25th and a nonviolent action in D.C. on Monday morning September 26th, with support from Campaign Nonviolence.

Join us to learn about and engage in working on viable alternatives to war and militarism.

The next application deadline for the JAPA Disarmament Fund is September 30, 2016.

Learn More and Check Out the Flyer


2016 Ceremony Invitation

Join us for a memorable afternoon of award presentations and responses by authors and illustrators. Come meet and talk with the honored guests, including Award winners and honorees. Enjoy a reception and an opportunity for book signing after formal presentation of the awards. All the award books will be available for purchase. This event is free and open to all. Reservations are not needed. Please come and enjoy!

Ceremony Invitation: JPG | PDF

Since 1953, the Jane Addams Children’s Book Award annually acknowledges books published in the U.S. during the previous year. Books commended by the Award address themes of topics that engage children in thinking about peace, justice, world community and/or equality of the sexes and all races. The books also must meet conventional standards of literacy and artistic excellence.

A national committee chooses winners and honor books for younger and older children.

Click here to read more about the 2016 Awards.



© 2016 Jane Addams Peace Association

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