Jane Addams Peace Association News

What Books are your Children Reading this Summer? Diversity in Knowledge Sources

Children of color need to be able to see themselves in the books they read. Just as importantly, all children need to be exposed to a wide range of books that reflect the true diversity of our nation and world as they really are.

Doreen Rappaport writes fiction and nonfiction that celebrate diverse histories and biographies like her Caldecott Medal winner Martin’s Big Words: The Life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. illustrated by Bryan Collier. Her curiosity about one kind of untold story left her wanting to know more and more: “I got into it because when I was a teenager there were no books about women. Maybe there was Eleanor Roosevelt and Jane Ad[d]ams - those were the only two books. There wasn’t much of a place for young girls with a curiosity, and maybe even an ambition, and actually we were told not to be ambitious.”

Poet and author Carole Boston Weatherford approaches history from another angle: she said she “mine[s] the past for family stories, fading traditions, and forgotten struggles” in order to help fill in the gaps of the stories being told. Many of her books are based on historical events spanning the African American experience from slavery through the Civil Rights Movement, and she said children are often amazed to learn the stories she writes about are true: “It never fails, one of the first questions is, ‘Did that really happen?’ Well, you know, that’s exactly the reaction that I want from the kids - because they can’t fathom that some of the inhumanities and injustices that were part of legalized segregation and part of America’s history of institutionalized racism really happened.”

Let’s make sure all children have access to engaging books that help them see themselves and, to paraphrase Doreen Rappaport, fill in all pieces of the real story of our nation and world.

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Martin’s Big Words: The Life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. written by Doreen Rappaport with artwork by Bryan Collier 2002 Awardee

Birmingham, 1963 by Carole Boston Weatherford 2008 Awardee


“School Days, School Days” Theme August Book Buzz

It’s just around the corner - start-up friendships at bus stops, new tennis shoes and backpacks, sharpened No. 2 pencils, erasers intact, and books rich with the scent of fresh ink. Newsbee anticipates the joy and challenges of another school year with his August “School Days, School Days” theme.

Too often we take our education for granted-not the African American children in “Steamboat School,” a book by Deborah Hopkinson inspired by the true story of the Rev. John Berry Meachum of St. Louis. Sepia toned-pages, and Ron Husband’s pen and ink illustrations depict all the joy and sadness on the faces of those fighting to learn; history comes to life again, thanks to Deborah Hopkinson, a prolific author and a hive favorite.

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Girl Wonder: A Baseball Story in Nine Innings by Deborah Hopkinson, illustrated by Terry Wideners, 2004 Awardee

Shutting Out the Sky: Life in the Tenements of New York 1880-1924 by Deborah Hopkinson 2004 Awardee

A Band of Angels: A Story Inspired written by the Jubilee Singers by Deborah Hopkinson, illustrated by Ral Coln, 2000 Awardee


'Another Brooklyn’ Hits Reset on the Coming-of-Age Story

Jacqueline? Woodson does for young black girls what short-story master Alice Munro does for poor rural ones: She imbues their everyday lives with significance.

?How your friends become part of you and what happens if you lose them-that’s what drove Woodson to write Another Brooklyn. “Who are you without your girls?” she asks. “I truly believe that. Who are you without the people who help you make sense of the misogyny, the racism, the economic struggle, all of it? You need those people saying you’re a good mom, a great writer. You’re a great dresser. You cook well. Whatever the beauty is that you need to hear.”

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Each Kindness written by Jacqueline Woodson, illustrated by E.B. Lewis 2013 Awardee

From the Notebooks of Melanin Sun by Jacqueline Woodson 1996 Awardee

I Hadn’t Meant to Tell You This by Jacqueline Woodson 1995 Awardee


World Beyond War 2016 conference

The World Beyond War 2016 conference, sponsored in part through the Jane Addams Peace Association’s Disarmament Fund, is planning a big event in Washington, D.C., in September 2016, just after the International Day of Peace, including a conference on Friday September 23 through Sunday September 25. They are also working with the National Campaign for Nonviolent Resistance (NCNR) which is planning a nonviolent activism training and planning session on the 25th and a nonviolent action in D.C. on Monday morning September 26th, with support from Campaign Nonviolence.

Join us to learn about and engage in working on viable alternatives to war and militarism.

The next application deadline for the JAPA Disarmament Fund is September 30, 2016.

Learn More and Check Out the Flyer


2016 Ceremony Invitation

Join us for a memorable afternoon of award presentations and responses by authors and illustrators. Come meet and talk with the honored guests, including Award winners and honorees. Enjoy a reception and an opportunity for book signing after formal presentation of the awards. All the award books will be available for purchase. This event is free and open to all. Reservations are not needed. Please come and enjoy!

Ceremony Invitation: JPG | PDF

Since 1953, the Jane Addams Children’s Book Award annually acknowledges books published in the U.S. during the previous year. Books commended by the Award address themes of topics that engage children in thinking about peace, justice, world community and/or equality of the sexes and all races. The books also must meet conventional standards of literacy and artistic excellence.

A national committee chooses winners and honor books for younger and older children.

Click here to read more about the 2016 Awards.

Lowery Book Wins Award

Selma native Lynda Blackmon Lowery has won an award for her book that details turning 15 years old while participating in the Selma to Montgomery march of 1965.

Lowery was awarded the 2016 Jane Addams Children?s Book Award for her memoir, ?Turning 15 on the Road to Freedom.?

?It?s a great honor to win the award because the book teaches about tolerance and freedom, and it feels fantastic. I?m very humble,? Lowrey said.

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Turning 15 on the Road to Freedom: My Story of the 1965 Selma Voting Rights March by Lynda Blackmon Lowery 2016 Awardee


Authors descend on Asheville bookstores in August

‘Glam’ picture book illustrator

Introducing her new picture book, “Mary Had a Little Glam” (words by Tammi Sauer), Vanessa Brantley-Newton will read at Spellbound Aug. 13. The book is a new spin on familiar nursery rhymes, led by fashionista Mary, who helps characters from the kids who live in a shoe to Jack (of Jack and Jill) to up their fashion game. It?s a Fancy-Nancy style story with a twist. Charlotte-based Brantley-Newton is the illustrator of numerous picture books, including ?One Love,? ?Every Little Thing? and ?Lady Day: Billie Holiday and the Dog Who Loved Her.?

Brantley-Newton will appear at 11 a.m. Aug. 13 at Spellbound.

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We Shall Overcome: The Story of a Song written by Debbie Levy and illustrated by Vanessa Brantley-Newton 2014 Awardee


Bonds of Brooklyn

With ?Another Brooklyn,? Jacqueline Woodson has delivered a love letter to loss, girlhood, and home. It is a lyrical, haunting exploration of family, memory, and other ties that bind us to one another and the world.

The language Woodson uses is, at times, astonishing. Her sentences are wonders of economy. On her pages, the oft-derided patois of teenage girlfriends ? full of song lyrics, school-room facts, overheard news reports, and that gravely mystifying and misunderstood word, ?love? ? become elegantly sparse, full of a deep, existential longing.

The plot and language of ?Another Brooklyn? are simple, but the themes and emotions are not. This remarkable book is like water. It is deceptively fluid, the languid language and pacing circling back around itself, deepening with each whirl. What begins as a homecoming novel, shifts into a coming-of-age tale until, at the end, the book has turned again and we see that this story is an elegy for both girlhood and a Brooklyn that no longer exists.

Read More and NPR Interview

Each Kindness written by Jacqueline Woodson, illustrated by E.B. Lewis 2013 Awardee

From the Notebooks of Melanin Sun by Jacqueline Woodson 1996 Awardee

I Hadn?t Meant to Tell You This by Jacqueline Woodson 1995 Awardee


The Enduring Power of Faith Ringgold?s Art

?I got a fabulous education in art?wonderful teachers who taught me everything except anything about African art or African American art. But I traveled and took care of that part myself.?

Ringgold passionately combines a deep commitment to social activism with a style that draws from folk art and modernist painting. Across her body of work, paintings and sculptures lay bare the discrimination that plagues our world and double as rallying cries for urgent change. ?You can?t sit around waiting for somebody else to say who you are. You need to write it and paint it and do it,? she once said. ?That?s the power of being an artist.? And while the subjects and scenes that fill Ringgold?s compositions are inspired by the American experience, the themes are universal: inequality and the struggle for its eradication.

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Aunt Harriet’s Underground Railroad in the Sky by Faith Ringgold 1993 Awardee


World Beyond War 2016 conference

The World Beyond War 2016 conference, sponsored in part through the Jane Addams Peace Association’s Disarmament Fund, is planning a big event in Washington, D.C., in September 2016, just after the International Day of Peace, including a conference on Friday September 23 through Sunday September 25. They are also working with the National Campaign for Nonviolent Resistance (NCNR) which is planning a nonviolent activism training and planning session on the 25th and a nonviolent action in D.C. on Monday morning September 26th, with support from Campaign Nonviolence.

Join us to learn about and engage in working on viable alternatives to war and militarism.

The next application deadline for the JAPA Disarmament Fund is September 30, 2016.

Learn More and Check Out the Flyer


2016 Ceremony Invitation

Join us for a memorable afternoon of award presentations and responses by authors and illustrators. Come meet and talk with the honored guests, including Award winners and honorees. Enjoy a reception and an opportunity for book signing after formal presentation of the awards. All the award books will be available for purchase. This event is free and open to all. Reservations are not needed. Please come and enjoy!

Ceremony Invitation: JPG | PDF

Since 1953, the Jane Addams Children’s Book Award annually acknowledges books published in the U.S. during the previous year. Books commended by the Award address themes of topics that engage children in thinking about peace, justice, world community and/or equality of the sexes and all races. The books also must meet conventional standards of literacy and artistic excellence.

A national committee chooses winners and honor books for younger and older children.

Click here to read more about the 2016 Awards.

CCBC Drilling Down on Diversity in Picture Books

Metadata on Picture Books Project

“For 2016 we are launching a pilot project to do a more in-depth analysis of the year’s picture books (excluding non-fiction titles, such as picture-book biographies). We’re keeping track of the things people want to know. Just how many picture books have animal, rather than human, characters? How many books about African American characters are historical? How many feature LGBTQ families? Or Muslims? Or people with disabilities? How many are by first-time authors or illustrators? We’ll be able to tell you in early 2017.”

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10 Children’s Books That Help White Kids Understand What Children Of Color Are Up Against

Patricia Polacco’s ‘Pink and Say’ is an exceptional story based around the Civil War that details a story of a black family who put their life in danger to care for a young white boy who was wounded. Great for taking a small look into racism, Polacco’s book will help your children see just how dangerous it was to be caring as a person of color.

Jacqueline Woodson’s 'The Other Side’ is a story of a friendship not held by the restraints of color and displays a very realistic lesson on how racism is taught to the youth.

Another true story surrounded around segregation, Margot Theis Raven’s civil rights story 'Let Them Play’ teaches children about equality and displays how ignorance and bigotry can cost you what you desire most.

'The Watson’s Go to Birmingham - 1963’ [by Christopher Paul Curtis] gives a look into the horrific and historical burning of the Sixteenth Avenue Baptist Church with four little girls inside through the eyes of a young boy.

Calvin Alexander Ramsey’s book 'Ruth and the Green Book’ unveils the unfortunate treatment of blacks through the eyes of young Ruth who travels with her family from Chicago to Alabama using the help of The Green Book.

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Mrs. Katz and Tush by Patricia Polacco 1993 Awardee

Each Kindness written by Jacqueline Woodson, illustrated by E.B. Lewis 2013 Awardee

From the Notebooks of Melanin Sun by Jacqueline Woodson 1996 Awardee

I Hadn’t Meant to Tell You This by Jacqueline Woodson 1995 Awardee

Night Boat to Freedom, written by Margot Theis Raven with pictures by E. B. Lewis 2007 Awardee

The Watsons Go to Birmingham - 1963 by Christopher Paul Curtis 1996 Awardee

Belle, the Last Mule at Gee’s Bend written by Calvin Alexander Ramsey and Bettye Stroud, illustrated by John Holyfield 2012 Awardee

Ruth and the Green Book by Calvin Alexander Ramsey with Gwen Strauss and illustrated by Floyd Cooper 2011 Awardee


New program uses chalk to recreate works of Latino artists at Waukegan Municipal Beach

Chalk drawings of Mexican-American artist Duncan Tonatiuh’s work adorn a pier at Waukegan Municipal Beach.

The drawings - of food, people and pyramids - were made just minutes before by a group who gather at the pier on Fridays to recreate artwork by famous Latino artists.

Host Julie Contreras said the Chalk It Out Waukegan program gathers at the beach to learn about Hispanic artists. Children and adults sit in a circle on the pier while Contreras leads bilingual discussions about an artist and their contributions. After the discussion, the group creates artwork based on the work of the artist.

Tonatiuh was the only living artist discussed this summer. Others included Mexican painter Frida Kahlo and Spanish-born artist Pablo Picasso.

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Separate is Never Equal: Sylvia Mendez and her family’s fight for desegregation, written and illustrated by Duncan Tonatiuh 2015 Awardee


Jacqueline Woodson: When a Southern Town Broke a Heart

The fleeting moments of childhood are etched deep in my memory - the salty indentations of baby teeth newly gone, the tug of hairbrushes through knotted hair, the heat and smell of the straightening comb, my mother’s broad shoulders and easy smile - and a summer in South Carolina, when the deep green beauty revealed my place and time in history and laid claim to that moment all children know, when the tendrils of adulthood move toward us, showing themselves long before we are ready to see.

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Each Kindness written by Jacqueline Woodson, illustrated by E.B. Lewis 2013 Awardee

From the Notebooks of Melanin Sun by Jacqueline Woodson 1996 Awardee

I Hadn’t Meant to Tell You This by Jacqueline Woodson 1995 Awardee


Naomi Shihab Nye: Your Life Is a Poem

Growing up, the poet Naomi Shihab Nye lived in Ferguson, Missouri and on the road between Ramallah and Jerusalem. Her father was a refugee Palestinian journalist, and through her poetry, she carries forward his hopeful passion, his insistence, that language must be a way out of cycles of animosity.

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and

Naomi Shihab Nye: Beauty & Empathy

Rooted in her experience as a Palestinian American, Nye addresses international politics, immigration, identity, and other issues with a poet’s particular ability to connect. HPR’s Noe Tanigawa interviewed her at Shangri-La, where Nye is currently Artist in Residence.

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Habibi written by Naomi Shihab Nye 1998 Awardee


Two Responses to Faith Ringgold’s New Exhibit at MOMA

How Do Black Lives Matter in MoMA’s Collection?

While the artist worried that Die would be a prophesy of her times, the work has proven to anticipate a far longer arc.

Let’s be clear about how Ringgold’s work resonates today: Just as the painting indicts all of the suit-and-dress-wearing, white-collar workers in her picture, we must implicate the professional institutions in which we find ourselves as part of a broader anti-black culture.

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and

From the Archives: Faith Ringgold, the Art Workers Coalition, and the Fight for Inclusion at The Museum of Modern Art

After seeing Faith Ringgold’s monumental, harrowing painting, American People Series #20: Die (1967), I was inspired to reflect upon this new acquisition. For while the painting has only recently arrived at the Museum, the artist was actively engaging with the institution on issues of race and exclusion during the same period of its making, the late 1960s.

It was a time when artists agitated for change, for more control and inclusion in cultural institutions, as well as addressing related social and political issues.

One such group was the Art Workers Coalition (AWC), in which Ringgold was active, and she, along with Tom Lloyd, co-led a black coalition within the group of artists, architects, filmmakers, critics, and museum and gallery personnel.

Even if the shortcomings of our past do not exemplify our aspirations or expectations, it is important to understand and narrate that past to help us shape a future of progress, inclusion, and hope.

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Aunt Harriet’s Underground Railroad in the Sky by Faith Ringgold 1993 Awardee

Since 1953, the Jane Addams Children’s Book Award annually acknowledges books published in the U.S. during the previous year. Books commended by the Award address themes of topics that engage children in thinking about peace, justice, world community and/or equality of the sexes and all races. The books also must meet conventional standards of literacy and artistic excellence.

A national committee chooses winners and honor books for younger and older children.

Click here to read more about the 2016 Awards.

MOMA Acquires and Hangs a Major Early Faith Ringgold

In 2010, though, the Neuberger Museum of Art, at Purchase College in New York, reminded everyone of Ringgold?s early achievements, showing rarely seen paintings from the 1960s?searingly radical works that present racial strife and incisive political messages, as in Flag for the Moon: Die Nigger (1969), an American flag with the last two words of the piece?s title hidden within its stars and stripes.

Now the Museum of Modern Art in New York has, too, adding American People Series #20: Die (1967) to its holdings. The painting appeared in Ringgold?s first solo show, at the Spectrum co-op gallery in 1967. It shows a race riot in progress, bodies falling in every direction, even off of the canvas so that only limbs visible. Twelve feet long and six feet tall, it covers two square canvases. An all-over composition reminiscent of a Pollock abstraction or a Stuart Davis picture or, as MoMA points out on its wall label, Picasso?s Guernica.

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Aunt Harriet’s Underground Railroad in the Sky by Faith Ringgold 1993 Awardee


Playwright Calvin Alexander Ramsey’s Documentary THE GREEN BOOK CHRONICLES Tells Of Getting Around Jim Crow

Playwright Calvin Alexander Ramsey’s THE GREEN BOOK, was created from interviews with many elderly African Americans who recalled emotions of peril and fear while traveling which. The play had its 2011 world premiere at Atlanta’s Theatrical Outfit and went on to win recognition as a finalist in the 12th Annual Last Frontier Theater Conference held in Valdez, Alaska.

He wrote about the subject again in the children’s book “Ruth and The Green Book,” about a young girl whose family uses the book on a trip from their home in Chicago to visit her grandma in Alabama.

Ramsey’s newest project is a full-length documentary about the history of “The Green Book” with commentary from those who used it to survive while on the road.

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Belle, the Last Mule at Gee?s Bend written by Calvin Alexander Ramsey and Bettye Stroud, illustrated byJohn Holyfield 2012 Awardee

Ruth and the Green Book by Calvin Alexander Ramsey with Gwen Strauss and illustrated by Floyd Cooper 2011 Awardee


Young-Adult Author Jacqueline Woodson on Writing Stories That Appeal to All Ages

The award-winning writer talked to The Root about her latest work, her first book for adults in over a decade.

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From the Notebooks of Melanin Sun Jacqueline Woodson 1996 Awardee

I Hadn’t Meant to Tell You This 1995 Awardee

Each Kindness written by Jacqueline Woodson, illustrated by E.B. Lewis 2013 Awardee


We Need Diverse Books To Publish 2 Anthologies With Stories By Matt De La Pena, Jacqueline Woodson And More

The two anthologies ? one middle grade and the other young adult ? will feature an incredible lineup of diverse authors. The MG anthology, titled Flying Lessons & Other Stories, will include original stories from Newbery Medal winners Matt de la Pea and Kwame Alexander, National Book Award winner Jacqueline Woodson, Soman Chainani, Tim Federle, Grace Lin, Meg Medina, Tim Tingle, and the late Walter Dean Myers, a five-time Coretta Scott King award winner and a winner of the Printz Medal. The collection will also feature a story from debut author Kelly J. Baptist, the winner of WNDB’s short-story contest.

The second collection ? a young adult collection ? is titled Lift Off. The anthology will include original stories from Melissa de la Cruz, Sara Farizan, Eric Gansworth, Malinda Lo, Daniel Jos Older, Thien Pham, Jason Reynolds, Gene Luen Yang, and Nicola Yoon. The anthology will be dedicated in memory of Walter Dean Myers.

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From the Notebooks of Melanin Sun Jacqueline Woodson 1996 Awardee

I Hadn’t Meant to Tell You This 1995 Awardee

Each Kindness written by Jacqueline Woodson, illustrated by E.B. Lewis 2013 Awardee

Crossing Bok Chitto: told in written form by nationally recognized Choctaw storyteller, Tim Tingle, illustrated by Jeanne Rorex Bridges 2007 Awardee

Now Is Your Time! The African-American Struggle for Freedom by Walter Dean Myers 1992 Awardee

Patrol: An American Soldier in Vietnam written by Walter Dean Myers and illustrated by Ann Grifalconi 2003 Awardee


9 Books By Latin Authors I Wish I Had As A Teenager

As a child growing up Mexican-American in El Paso, Texas, this book about a Mexican girl’s search for her place in the world was exactly what I needed.

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Silver People: Voices from the Panama Cana by Margarita Engle 2015 Awardee

The Surrender Tree: Poems of Cuba’s Struggle for Freedom 2009 Awardee


Publishers Weekly: Spring 2017 Children’s Sneak Previews

Henry Holt revs up for Bravo: Poems About Amazing Latinos by Margarita Engle, illus. by Rafael Lopez, paying poetic tribute to Latinos who have faced life?s challenges in creative ways …

Holiday House sets up the telescope for Caroline?s Comets by Emily Arnold McCully, profiling the 18th-century housekeeper-turned-world-famous-astronomer Caroline Herschel…

From Clarion, One for Sorrow by Mary Downing Hahn, the chilling tale of a bullied girl who dies during the flu epidemic of 1918 and returns to haunt one of her tormentors …

From RANDOM HOUSE/LAMB, Girl Rising by Tanya Lee Stone, in association with Girl Rising, an exploration of various barriers to education inspired by a film from the titular global campaign for girls? education

Schwartz & Wade steps up to the plate with A Letter to My Teacher by Deborah Hopkinson, illus. by Nancy Carpenter, written as a thank-you note to a special teacher from the student who never forgot her.

Beach Lane Books presents Secret Project by Jonah Winter, illus. by Jeanette Winter, which focuses on one of history?s most secret scientific projects?the creation of the atomic bomb…

Dangerous Jane Gets a New Name (working title) by Suzanne Slade, illus. by Alice Ratterree, a picture book biography of activist Jane Addams

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The Escape of Oney Judge: Martha Washington?s Slave Finds Freedom by Emily Arnold McCully 2008 Awardee

December Stillness by Mary Downing Hahn 1989 Awardee

Silver People: Voices from the Panama Cana by Margarita Engle 2015 Awardee

The Surrender Tree: Poems of Cuba’s Struggle for Freedom 2009 Awardee

Almost Astronauts: 13 Women Who Dared to Dream by Tanya Lee Stone 2010 Awardee

Girl Wonder: A Baseball Story in Nine Innings by Deborah Hopkinson 2004 Awardee

Shutting Out the Sky: Life in the Tenements of New York 1880-1924 2004 Awardee

A Band of Angels: A Story Inspired written by the Jubilee Singers 2000 Awardee

Lillian?s Right to Vote: A Celebration of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 by Jonah Winter, illustrated by Shane W. Evan 2016 Awardee

Nasreen?s Secret School: A True Story from Afghanistan, written and illustrated by Jeanette Winter 2010 Awardee

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Since 1953, the Jane Addams Children’s Book Award annually acknowledges books published in the U.S. during the previous year. Books commended by the Award address themes of topics that engage children in thinking about peace, justice, world community and/or equality of the sexes and all races. The books also must meet conventional standards of literacy and artistic excellence.

A national committee chooses winners and honor books for younger and older children.

Read more about the 2016 Awards.

11 Children’s Books That Teach The Importance Of Understanding Privilege

  • ‘Henry’s Freedom Box: A True Story From The Underground Railroad’ by Ellen Levine, Illus. by Kadir Nelson
  • 'Separate Is Never Equal: Sylvia Mendez and Her Family’s Fight for Desegregation’ by Duncan Tonatiuh
  • 'Chocolate Me!’ by Taye Diggs, Illus. by Shane W. Evans
  • 'Sit-In: How Four Friends Stood Up by Sitting Down’ by Andrea Davis Pinkney, Illus. by Brian Pinkney

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The Village That Vanished written by Ann Grifalconi and illustrated by Kadir Nelson 2003 Awardee

Heart and Soul: The Story of America and African Americans written and illustrated by Kadir Nelson 2012 Awardee

Darkness over Denmark: The Danish Resistance and the Rescue of the Jews written by Ellen Levine 2001 Awardee

Freedom’s Children: Young Civil Rights Activists Tell Their Stories written by Ellen Levine 1994 Awardee

Separate is Never Equal: Sylvia Mendez and her family’s fight for desegregation, written and illustrated by Duncan Tonatiuh 2015 Awardee

Lillian’s Right to Vote: A Celebration of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 by Jonah Winter, illustrated by Shane W. Evans 2016 Awardee

We March written and illustrated by Shane W. Evans 2013 Awardee

Sit-In: How Four Friends Stood Up by Sitting Down by Andrea Davis Pinkney, illustrated by Brian Pinkney 2011 Awardee

Sojourner Truth’s Step-Stomp Stride, by Andrea Davis Pinkney & Brian Pinkney 2010 Awardee


Naomi Shihab Nye: Poetry/Fiction/Creative Nonfiction Reading

For the Ransom Center’s 2016 Burnshaw Lecture series, poet and MCW visiting professor Naomi Shihab Nye will give a reading of her work.
Event Date and Time: September 29, 2016, 7:00 PM

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Habibi written by Naomi Shihab Nye 1998 Awardee


Young author beats hundreds to win national writing prize

Elsie Leiper, aged 12, from Hemel Hempstead. Winner of the Henrietta Branford Writing Competition for young writers, 2016.

Elsie attended the Branford Boase Award celebration party in London last week and was awarded her prize by Carnegie Medal-winning author Beverley Naidoo.

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Talented teen comes first in writing contest

Jessica Woods came top in the 2016 Henrietta Branford Writing Competition, an annual event for young people that aims to find and encourage writers of the future.

The Wakefield Girls’ High School student was awarded her prize by Carnegie Medal-winning author Beverley Naidoo at the Branford Boase Award celebration party in London last week.

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Out of Bounds: Seven Stories of Conflict and Hope, written by Beverley Naidoo 2004 Awardee

The Other Side of Truth written by Beverley Naidoo 2002 Awardee


2016 Oswego Writing Institute Features Award-Winning Authors

The 2016 Oswego Writing Institute will benefit the Literacy Coalition of Oswego County August 16-17. The Institute will be at the SUNY Oswego Campus Center from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. each day and feature keynote presentations by authors Carole Boston Weatherford and Gary D. Schmidt.

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Birmingham, 1963 by Carole Boston Weatherford 2008 Awardee

Since 1953, the Jane Addams Children’s Book Award annually acknowledges books published in the U.S. during the previous year. Books commended by the Award address themes of topics that engage children in thinking about peace, justice, world community and/or equality of the sexes and all races. The books also must meet conventional standards of literacy and artistic excellence.

A national committee chooses winners and honor books for younger and older children.

Click here to read more about the 2016 Awards.



© 2016 Jane Addams Peace Association

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