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Now for the fifth installment of our seven part series on the 2013 Jane Addams Children’s Book Award Ceremony. Below you will find the introduction given by Tracy Randolph for Marching to the Mountaintop by Ann Bausum.

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Marching to the Mountaintop by Ann Bausum thoroughly explains the relationship between the Sanitation Workers Strike of 1968 in Memphis and Dr. Martin Luther King’s Poor People’s Campaign. Her impressive narrative is enhanced with dozens of striking photographs from these two events and chronicles Dr. King’s final push for justice and equality for all people.

Tracy Randolph, Jane Addams Book Awards Committee Member
Middle School Sponsor

Seventh grade Humanities teacher

English teacher

Kindness rocks

JAPA as a socially responsible investor has joined with over 80 other environmental and human rights organizations and financial institutions in a letter to Apple VP Lisa Jackson. We urge her to live up to her legacy as US EPA Administrator and protect iPhone workers from hazardous chemicals.

Read the letter here:http://www.greenamerica.org/bad-apple/letter-to-lisa-jackson.cfm

To send your own message to Apple executives, use our new mock app: Want to end smartphone sweatshops? Here’s the App for that! www.greenamerica.org/bad-apple/app.cfm

Now for the fourth installment of our seven part series on the 2013 Jane Addams Children’s Book Award Ceremony. Below you will find the introduction given by Julie Olsen Edwards for Dolores Huerta: A Hero to Migrant Workers by Sarah Warren; illustrated by Robert Casillia.

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Dolores is a friend. Dolores is a mother. Dolores is a storyteller. Dolores is a detective, a warrior, an organizer, a peacemaker.

In simple words and powerful images, this young children’s book portrays Dolores Huerta, one of the most important American leaders of our times, as intelligent, courageous, and persistently effective in her work to organize farm workers.

The workers, mainly Mexican American immigrants, are portrayed as hard working, caring deeply for their children and willing to struggle to have a union that makes possible a living wage, safe working conditions, fairness and justice. All this is done in a few short pages - with art work that matches the power and simplicity of the text - artwork showing Dolores aging - demonstrating how struggles for justice take time to succeed.

"Dolores is a teacher. She Teaches people how to work as a team. She teaches people how to take care of each other. This is Dolores".
And this remarkable book is a 2013 Honor Book for younger children.

Introduction by JACBA Committee Member Julie Olsen Edwards.

Now for the third installment of our seven part series on the 2013 Jane Addams Children’s Book Award Ceremony. Below you will find the introduction given by Ann Carpenter, Selection Committee Member for We March, written and illustrated by Shane W. Evan, published by Neal Porter/Roaring Brook Press.

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Waking early in the morning children and their families prepare for their day - a momentous task as this is the day they will “follow their leaders” to make a difference in their world by taking part in the March on Washington. Throughout a day marked by community support the family participates in the historic protest. An afterward by the author provides more information for interested readers.

One of the many strengths of this short but powerful book is its ability to be read on many levels. Preschoolers identify with the need to work together and to stand up for what you believe in. Older children absorb the powerful message of our ability to create change by protesting injustice. Young people with the background knowledge to understand the historical and cultural context of the March on Washington build on their appreciation of a landmark Civil Rights event.

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For its ability to be understood and appreciated by our youngest readers and listeners, to spark discussions about history, culture, and the power of group protest, and to inspire us to take action, the Jane Addams Book Award Committee is proud to name We March by Shane Evans as an Honor book in the Younger Reader category.

Now for the second installment of our seven part series on the 2013 Jane Addams Children’s Book Award Ceremony. Below you will find the introduction given by Susan Freiss, Selection Committee Member for Temple Grandin: How the Girl Who Loved Cows Embraced Autism and Changed the World by Sy Montgomery.

Temple Grandin: How the Girl Who Loved Cows Embraced Autism and Changed the World

Temple Grandin: How the Girl Who Loved Cows Embraced Autism and Changed the World by Sy Montgomery, published by Houghton Mifflin Books for Children, is named an Honor Book for Older Children. This biography with much first person input from Ms. Grandin herself explains how her autistic mind works, how her peers and family perceive her, and her relentless efforts as an activist.

Introduction Remarks by Susan Freiss, Selection committee member.

This biography, written with much first person input from Temple herself, explores her perspective and experience growing up and living with autism. We see Temple overcoming obstacles and prejudice put in her way as a woman and as a differently able person. Temple combined her love of animals and her unique insights to create cruelty free animal facilities that are now used around the world.

Sy Montgomery on right

Reka Somonsen, Houghton Mifflin and Susan Freiss, Book Awards Committee Member

The children who read this book in my class had a very positive and energetic response. Temple’s story facilitates a shift in heart and mind, illustrating not someone with a disability but someone with amazing abilities. This is a powerful book for children who feel different or wonder about those around them who seem different. Temple found her idiosyncratic self-confidence and strength and will be whole-heartedly admired by the young readers of this engaging biography.



© 2014 Jane Addams Peace Association