Jane Addams Peace Association News

GKIDS, Angelina Jolie-Pitt bringing ‘Breadwinner’ to North American theaters in 2017

GKIDS is producing, financing and distributing The Breadwinner, which is an adaptation of the young-adult novel by Deborah Ellis. New York-based animation distributor GKIDS announces that CEO/Founder Eric Beckman and SVP of Distribution David Jesteadt will executive produce - along with Angelina Jolie Pitt and others - The Breadwinner, the latest feature from two-time Oscar nominated studio Cartoon Saloon. The screenplay is co-written by Anita Doron and Deborah Ellis.

Based on the internationally acclaimed children’s novel by Deborah Ellis, ?The Breadwinner’ tells the story of Parwana, a 12 year old girl growing up in Afghanistan in 2001. When her father is arrested, Parwana dresses as a boy in order to work and provide for her family. Together with her best friend Shauzia, she risks discovery to try to find out if her father is still alive.

A story of self-empowerment and imagination in the face of oppression, The Breadwinner also celebrates the culture, history and beauty of Afghanistan.

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The Heaven Shop by Deborah Ellis 2005 Awardee

The Breadwinner Trilogy by Deborah Ellis 2004 Awardee

Parvana’s Journey by Deborah Ellis 2003 Awardee


Pam Muoz Ryan Wins Children’s History Book Prize

Author Pam Muoz Ryan received New-York Historical Society’s 2016 Children’s History Book Prize for Echo (Scholastic, 2015).

The theme of standing up to prejudice and injustice and how these struggles are intertwined in the lives of these children from different geographic, cultural, and ethnic backgrounds resonated with our educator, historian, and student jurors.

The novel, which already won a Newbery Honor earlier this year, is a blend of historical fiction and magical realism, about children connected across decades and continents by a mysterious harmonica.

With Echo, Muoz Ryan is continuing to inspire children to engage with difficult topics like intolerance and injustice.

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Esperanza Rising by Pam Muoz Ryan 2001 Awardee


Op-ed: When I met Muhammad Ali in the Tabernacle by Phillip Hoose

One Sunday morning in 1997, I met Muhammad Ali at the Mormon Tabernacle in Salt Lake City… When I reached Ali, I thanked him for refusing to be drafted into the Vietnam War. I extended my hand but rather than shake it, Ali slipped a piece of paper into it and winked.

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Claudette Colvin by Phillip Hoose 2010 Awardee

Hey, Little Ant written by Phillip and Hannah Hoose 1999 Awardee


Prolific Author Proves Power of Word

Students prepared for Woodson’s visit, coordinated by Kent District Library as part of the KDL Reads program, by using the book as inspiration for writing poetry and essays of their own for the high-school Aspiring Writers Contest.

Woodson also visited Wyoming High School, where juniors prepared by publishing a book of their own prose. Godwin Heights Middle and High School students also participated in Literary Lunches to study “Brown Girl Dreaming.”

Woodson has visited many schools across the country, but Godwin Heights and Wyoming were her last planned visits. She said she enjoys meeting teenagers.

“They’re open and honest and hungry and looking for ways to represent themselves in the world,” she said.

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Each Kindness written by Jacqueline Woodson, illustrated by E.B. Lewis 2013 Awardee

From the Notebooks of Melanin Sun by Jacqueline Woodson 1996 Awardee

I Hadn’t Meant to Tell You This by Jacqueline Woodson 1995 Awardee


Q & A with Emily Arnold McCully

Q: How do you research your books, and is there a time period you’ve especially enjoyed looking into?

A: I prefer to research my stories with actual books…

I am most at home in the 18th and 19th centuries, but have researched medieval China (Beautiful Warrior) and closed off Japan (Manjiro). My mission is often to recover forgotten or little known girls and women who made significant contributions to the human story.

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New York City Children’s Theater Celebrates 20th Anniversary Season

Break out the tutus and toe-shoes for Sophie the Swan’s latest adventure. A companion piece to the hit BALLERINA SWAN, this world premiere blends ballet and puppetry as Sophie prepares for her first holiday performance of “The Nutcracker.” Based on the book BALLERINA SWAN by Allegra Kent and illustrated by Emily Arnold McCully.

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The Escape of Oney Judge: Martha Washington’s Slave Finds Freedom written and illustrated by Emily Arnold McCully 2008 Awardee


Teaching Tuskegee Airmen’s story [Behind Pay Wall]

In “You Can Fly: The Tuskegee Airmen,” Carole Boston Weatherford writes about the historic African-American civilian pilot training program during World War II and the men who were the “Red Tails” and broke barriers as well as cemented their place in military, aviation and U.S. history.

Weatherford is an award-winning, best-selling author who teaches at Fayetteville State University and the book’s illustrator is her son, Jeffery Boston Weatherford. The Weatherfords will visit The Regulator Bookshop on June 15 to discuss their new book. A small hardcover that could easily fit in a backpack for middle grade readers ages 9 through 12, “You Can Fly” presents the Tuskegee Airmen’s story in a series of poems and black and white illustrations.

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Birmingham, 1963 by Carole Boston Weatherford 2008 Awardee


A Word In Edgewise: Keep Reinventing that Wheel

Trouble in Mind recently closed its triumphant run at the Guthrie (Mpls, MN). Splendidly acted and directed, Alice Childress’ 1955 drama centers around a young, white director (John Catron) rehearsing a mostly black cast of actors through the clichd Southern drama, Chaos in Belleville.

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A Hero Ain’t Nothin’ But A Sandwich by Alice Childress 1974 Awardee


Lion Island: Cuba’s Warrior of Words by Margarita Engle | SLJ Review

Engle transports readers to the world of 1870s Cuba, where Chinese indentured laborers struggle for freedom in a complex atmosphere of rebellion and injustice. This little- known and fascinating historical moment prompts Engle’s characters to consider privilege and equity from many different angles.

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Silver People: Voices from the Panama Canal by Margarita Engle 2015 Awardee

The Surrender Tree: Poems of Cuba’s Struggle for Freedom by Margarita Engle 2009 Awardee


2nd Annual Samantha Smith Challenge

Giving meaning to education. That’s what organizers say the Samantha Smith Challenge does for area middle-schoolers.

The late Samantha Smith was a Maine middle school student who inspired a dialogue of peace between the US and Soviet Union during the Cold War, after writing a letter to Yuri Andropov.

More than 400 students honored her legacy by presenting their community service projects to the public.

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Journey to the Soviet Union written by Samantha Smith 1986 Awardee

Since 1953, the Jane Addams Children’s Book Award annually acknowledges books published in the U.S. during the previous year. Books commended by the Award address themes of topics that engage children in thinking about peace, justice, world community and/or equality of the sexes and all races. The books also must meet conventional standards of literacy and artistic excellence.

A national committee chooses winners and honor books for younger and older children.

Click here to read more about the 2016 Awards.

Second Novel From Susan Lynn Meyer, Wellesley Professor of English, Inspired by Father’s Experiences in America After Escaping Nazi-Occupied France

Meyer’s Black Radishes, was named a Junior Library Guild Selection for 2016 and follows close on the heels of the news that Meyer’s 2015 picture book, New Shoes, won the 2016 Jane Addams Book Award, an honor given by the Jane Addams Peace Association for the most outstanding children’s book that promotes peace and justice. Meyer’s latest book, Skating with the Statue of Liberty, comes at a time when young adults are surrounded by discussions of intolerance and reminders of the nation’s history of treating immigrants displaced by war.

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New Shoes by Susan Lynn Meyer 2016 Awardee


Mixed-Up History

It is not necessarily a gloomy bit of history that Emily Arnold McCully reimagines in “Clara” (Schwartz & Wade, 48 pages, $17.99), but there must have been melancholy notes in reality, while there are almost none in this picture book with the charmingly exhaustive subtitle “The (Mostly) True Story of the Rhinocerous Who Dazzled Kings, Inspired Artists, and Won the Hearts of Everyone … While She Ate Her Way Up and Down a Continent!”

The wobbly lines and dashes of color in Ms. McCully’s illustrations reinforce the amiability of this tale for 4- to 8-year-olds.

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The Escape of Oney Judge: Martha Washington’s Slave Finds Freedom written and illustrated by Emily Arnold McCully 2008 Awardee


Chamber Music Charleston’s ‘Circle Unbroken’ tells story with multimedia and narration

“Circle Unbroken” is a multimedia work based on a children’s book by the same name written by Margot Theis Raven and illustrated by E. B. Lewis, whose watercolor additions to the book will be projected above the musicians during the performance.

Theis Raven’s book is about the history of the Sweetgrass basket, written as a conversation between a grandmother and a child. Ann Caldwell said that the book discusses Southern history in a relatable manner, filtering often weighty concepts through the eyes and ears of a child.

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Night Boat to Freedom, written by Margot Theis Raven with pictures by E. B. Lewis 2007 Awardee

Each Kindness written by Jacqueline Woodson, illustrated by E.B. Lewis 2013 Awardee


Off the shelf: 'Seedfolks,’ by Paul Fleischman

Fleischman transports us to Cleveland, Ohio, to a decades-old apartment complex that has hosted every age, gender, and ethnicity of person imaginable. Naturally, the cold, barren neighborhood is a breeding ground for prejudice, racism, sexism, ageism and unshakable animosity.

Fleischman’s answer for peace? A garden.

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Seedfolks by Paul Fleischman 1998 Awardee


North Park student writes winning essay at reader’s program

Hannah Eisenhauer, a seventh-grader honor roll student at North Park Junior High School, was the first-place essay winner at The Jackson Center’s Young Readers Program in Jamestown.

The Jackson Center’s Young Readers Program uses literature to engage young people with their world by inspiring them to read and hone their analytical skills and writing ability.

Newbery Medal award winner Linda Sue Park as the Jackson Center’s keynote author for its 2016 Young Readers Program for the book, “A Long Walk to Water,” which has sold more than 1 million copies since it was published in 2010. Park discussed her life and journey as a writer to the 1,400 student attendees.

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A Long Walk to Water: Based on a True Story by Linda Sue Park 2011 Awardee

When My Name Was Keoko by Linda Sue Park 2003 Awardee

Since 1953, the Jane Addams Children’s Book Award annually acknowledges books published in the U.S. during the previous year. Books commended by the Award address themes of topics that engage children in thinking about peace, justice, world community and/or equality of the sexes and all races. The books also must meet conventional standards of literacy and artistic excellence.

A national committee chooses winners and honor books for younger and older children.

Click here to read more about the 2016 Awards.

Knopf Celebrates 25 Years of Faith Ringgold’s ‘Tar Beach’

Published by Crown in 1991, 'Tar Beach,’ Faith Ringgold?s debut children?s book, won the Coretta Scott King Award for illustration and was named a Caldecott Honor Book. On May 10, Knopf released a 25th-anniversary edition of the book, as well as a new picture book by Ringgold, 'We Came to America,’ a celebration of this country?s multicultural heritage.

“Without doubt, Tar Beach is one of our most treasured picture books,” she said. “It represents Faith?s realism and idealism in equal capacities. I think of her as a chronicler of the African-American experience, and in this book she does it in a beautiful and relevant way. Tar Beach is a very important contribution to children?s literature, as well as a showcase of Faith?s gorgeous mixed-media art. To me, it epitomizes what a children?s book should be.”

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Aunt Harriet’s Underground Railroad in the Sky by Faith Ringgold 1993 Awardee


The fourth annual Thousand Islands Children?s Book Festival set for June 4

The fourth annual Thousand Islands Children?s Book Festival, “Reading on the River,” will be at the Cape Vincent Elementary School on Saturday, June 4.

Among the presenters:

Bryan Collier, a writer and illustrator, is from New York City. Among the honors he has received are the Coretta Scott King Award, the Erza Jack Keats New Illustrator Award, the Caldecott Medal and the Jane Addams Children?s Book Award for Picture Books. He has a style that incorporates both watercolors and collage.

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Martin’s Big Words: The Life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. written by Doreen Rappaport with artwork by Bryan Collier 2002 Awardee


Decatur author Carmen Agra Deedy’s tips to inspire a love of reading

Born in Cuba, Deedy came to America in 1964. She grew up in Decatur, (GA,) which is still her home.

Want to teach your children to build a “fortress of quietude” where they can escape the ever-present white noise of techno-babble?

Build them a reading fort. This does not require a trip to your building supply store; nor is it costly. A blanket or quilt over the kitchen table will do nicely, as will the pillows from the sofa.

The rule is: If you are actually reading in your fortress of quietude, you are left alone to do so for at least 30 minutes. Not solely for the use of the children in the household.

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The Yellow Star: The Legend of King Christian X of Denmark written by Carmen Agra Deedy 2001 Awardee


Special writer examines Chippaweh

How a society is warped over more than a century by the pressures brought to bear from unrestrained violent conquest in some of the most inhospitable climate and terrain on the planet: that is North Dakota.

A defeated people can turn to mysticism and that is what Erdrich’s people have done. There are those who dismiss this as “hocus pocus” and her books are not for them. To disrespect an entire people’s coping mechanism is self-defeating and is to miss so much.

A synopsis of the plot [of “LaRose”] would serve no purpose. It would read like a television soap opera, and would entirely miss the point of what makes Erdrich so special, her use of language.

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The Birchbark House by Louise Erdrich 2000 Awardee


Art From The Ashes. Japanese Painters Summon Hope.

On Friday, May 27, President Obama became the first sitting U.S. President to visit Hiroshima. Nearly 71 years after the United States dropped an atomic bomb on the city, Obama called for “a world without nuclear weapons,” and honored those who died. Here, from our archives, is a story about art, humanity, and Hiroshima’s survivors.

On a rainy summer night in 1948, Iri and Toshi Maruki realized they would have to paint Hiroshima.

After two years of preliminary studies, the Marukis completed in 1950 the first of fifteen monumental (six-by-twenty five foot) paintings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

These murals provide a startling record of the Bomb, rendered with an authenticity that could only be attained by witnesses to its effects. We may never get closer than these paintings to an understanding of nuclear war.

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Hiroshima No Pika by Toshi Maruki 1983 Awardee

Since 1953, the Jane Addams Children’s Book Award annually acknowledges books published in the U.S. during the previous year. Books commended by the Award address themes of topics that engage children in thinking about peace, justice, world community and/or equality of the sexes and all races. The books also must meet conventional standards of literacy and artistic excellence.

A national committee chooses winners and honor books for younger and older children.

Click here to read more about the 2016 Awards.

Fourth Grade Essayists Honored at UM-Flint Writing Adventure

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Award-winning children?s author and UM-Flint alumnus Christopher Paul Curtis presented the students with their awards while reminding them of the valuable communication skills that they develop simply from expressing themselves by practicing their writing.

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Elijah of Buxton by Christopher Paul Curtis 2008 Awardee

The Watsons Go to Birmingham – 1963 written by Christopher Paul Curtis 1996 Awardee

Faculty Member Jamie Hogan Honored with Lupine Award

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(Hogan’s) lush pastel and colored pencil illustrations seen in Island Birthday, which recently won a Lupine Award. Island Birthday was written by author Eva Murray and published by Tilbury House Publishers.

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Rickshaw Girl by Mitali Perkins,illustrations by Jamie Hogan 2008 Awardee

Author Phillip Hoose to speak at Gardiner Area High School

Hoose has responded to questions by youth about their place in history. He has identified young adults who have had a pivotal role in history, done extensive research and written books to bring these stories to life. His writing can help students see that they can be agents of change and help shape history. Through the powerful examples he provides, students can realize the rights and responsibilities of being a citizen of the United States and of the world, according to the release.

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Hey, Little Ant written by Phillip and Hannah Hoose 1999 Awardee

Claudette Colvin by Phillip Hoose 2010 Awardee

‘Thunder Boy Jr.’ Reflects Sherman Alexie & Yuyi Morales’ Commitment To Stories For Diverse Children

Representing a marginalized family was also important to Morales, who says that her job was to bring her own voice to the narrative, which included incorporating a little sister and a mother who calls the boy Thunder Boy Jr. despite his contempt for the moniker. This resulted in a melding of Sherman Alexie?s literal and succinct prose with Yuyi?s illuminate world to portray a family rarely seen in kids literature: a family that is not struggling but imperfectly happy.

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Harvesting Hope: The Story of Cesar Chavez, written by Kathleen Krull, illustrated by Yuyi Morales 2004 Awardee

Getting To Know Faith Ringgold
Described and Captioned Media Program, National Association of the Deaf

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Using animation, this video follows the life and career of Faith Ringgold. Viewers catch a glimpse of her childhood in Harlem and her experiences through the cultural upheavals of the 1970s. Today, she is a respected contemporary artist and author. Part of Getting To Know Artists Series.

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Aunt Harriet’s Underground Railroad in the Sky by Faith Ringgold 1993

Award-winning writers Sherman Alexie and Edwidge Danticat presided over a two-hour “Selected Shorts” program

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Danticat said she liked the feeling of sitting in the dark, taking in her words like any other member of the audience.

“It always sounds better than it did in my head,” she explained. A previous time Danticat was at Symphony Space, Tony winner Anika Noni Rose read her story “Claire of the Sea Light.”

“The audience was not really happy with my ending so I went home and changed it,” Danticat confided.

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Mama?s Nightingale: A Story of Immigration and Separation written by Edwidge Danticat 2016 Awardee

Carlisle Middle School students to support Afghan girls’ education

In 2014, Afghan native Rotarian Razia Jan, who established a school for girls, the Zabuli Education Center 30 miles outside the city of Kabul, visited the Carlisle Middle School. The students had been studying the causes of poverty and had read Razia?s ?Ray of Hope: An Afghanistan Girl?s Dream of an Education? by Elizabeth Suneby. Suneby accompanied Razia Jan on her visit to Carlisle. Challenged by their own studies and inspired by the personal contact with Jan and Suneby, the students have continued their quest to support the Zabuli Center. They have raised close to $7,000 and are determined to do more. So far this term, they have raised enough money to send two girls to school for a year.

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Razia?s Ray of Hope: One Girl?s Dream of an Education written by Elizabeth Suneby 2014 Awardee

?LaRose,? by Louise Erdrich

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Erdrich has always been fascinated by the relationship between revenge and justice, but while ?The Round House? suggested the allure of revenge, ?LaRose? comes down firmly on the side of forgiveness. Can a person do the worst possible thing and still be loved? Erdrich?s answer is a resounding yes.

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The Birchbark House by Louise Erdrich 2000 Awardee

Ruby Bridges to receive Children’s Discovery Museum honor

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Bridges’ selection had an unusual inspiration behind it: She was suggested by Kiana Martin, an eighth-grade student at Union Middle School. It’s the first time in the 16-year history of the Legacy for Children award that the nomination has come from a young museum visitor.

Kiana will join Bridges onstage at the San Jose McEnery Convention Center, asking questions she thinks people her age might want to know the answers to. Kiana and a few other young people from the YMCA’s Project Cornerstone program will present the award to Bridges.

That’s a great way to bring things full circle. Project Cornerstone developed an anti-bullying curriculum for Santa Clara County schools around Bridges’ book, “Through My Eyes.” And it’s also how Kiana learned about Bridges and her amazing tale.

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Through My Eyes by Ruby Bridges 2000 Awardee

New England Aquarium names octopus after Hancock author Sy Montgomery

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One of the newest residents of New England Aquarium in Boston is the namesake of one of the Granite State’s most celebrated writers.

Montgomery had visited the aquarium regularly for about a year while researching “The Soul of an Octopus,” and the center’s work and animals feature prominently in it, he said. “Sy’s energy and her enthusiasm around that particular animal … got us even more excited about these animals,” he said.

LaCasse said Montgomery’s work reminds readers how fascinating nature and her creatures are. “And it’s so accessible and so personal the way she writes, you can’t help but become immersed in it,” he said. “It’s a gift.”

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Temple Grandin: How the Girl Who Loved Cows Embraced Autism and Changed the World by Sy Montgomery 2013 Awardee

Jane Addams, Hull House, and the Devil Baby
by Harriet Hyman Alonso

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The following story is just one of hundreds which exemplify life and work at Hull House. It tells of the community?s belief that Addams was harboring a ?Devil Baby,? an infant monster born out of sin. But as Addams soon observed, the type of wrong-doing committed depended on who told the story.

Here I present to you the story of the Devil Baby as Jane Addams understood it. I follow this with a ?deeper analysis? I developed through reading the Chicago Tribune for the time of the crisis.

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Since 1953, the Jane Addams Children?s Book Award annually acknowledges books published in the U.S. during the previous year. Books commended by the Award address themes of topics that engage children in thinking about peace, justice, world community and/or equality of the sexes and all races. The books also must meet conventional standards of literacy and artistic excellence.

A national committee chooses winners and honor books for younger and older children.

Read more about the 2016 Awards.

Minneapolis author Louise Erdrich finds writing humor is the ‘hardest thing’
Louise Erdrich’s latest novel, “LaRose,” is a page-turner that reflects her experience of family and resilience.

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Louise Erdrich’s 15th novel, “LaRose,” entwines such weighty themes as war, family, adoption, death, grief, the Indian Child Welfare Act, reservation boarding schools, Indian culture and myth, and justice.

It’s also a page-turner. And it’s also, in parts, quite funny.

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The Birchbark House by Louise Erdrich 2000 Awardee

Best books for children and young adults this month

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The Extraordinary Suzy Wright: A Colonial Woman on the Frontier (Abrams, ages 8 to 12) by Teri Kanefield tells the story of Susanna “Suzy” Wright, a little-known 18th-century Quaker frontierswoman, poet and political activist. This richly illustrated book ? featuring maps, photographs and reproductions of letters and paintings ? offers an unusual portrait of colonial America and how one woman made her mark in it.

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The Girl From the Tar Paper School: Barbara Rose Johns and the advent of the Civil Rights Movement by Teri Kanefield 2015 Awardee

Sherman Alexie’s 'Thunder Boy Jr.’ May Be Slated To Be A New Classic And A Bestseller [Behind an Ad Wall]

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National Book Award winner Sherman Alexie’s new picture book Thunder Boy Jr. with Yuyi Morales pubs on May 10th, and it’s very unlikely to be on any banned book lists. In fact, publisher Little, Brown Books for Young Readers (LBYR) is rooting for Thunder Boy to make the bestseller list soon after its release.

The book represents both Alexie and Caldecott honored illustrator Yuyi Morales’ individual styles, incorporating the poetic flow of Alexie’s words along with the vibrant illustrations and magical world that Morales brings to each of her books.

LBYR editor-in-chief Alvina Ling expressed her excitement for Thunder Boy Jr. being “a joyful book about identity, and a celebration of a modern American Indian father and son relationship.”

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Harvesting Hope: The Story of Cesar Chavez, written by Kathleen Krull, illustrated by Yuyi Morales 2004 Awardee

Walter Dean Myers: Bookfest '03 - Webcast Addition to the Library of Congress [Video]

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SPEAKER: Walter Dean Myers
EVENT DATE: 2003/10/04

Speaker Biography: Walter Dean Myers has drawn on his own background and interests to produce more than seventy books for young people. For his work he has received many awards and honors, including two Newbery Honor Book Awards, five Coretta Scott King Awards, the first Michael J. Printz Award, and a Margaret A. Edwards Award. His most recent book is Blues Journey (Holiday House, 2003), illustrated by his son, Christopher. Walter Dean Myers lives in Jersey City, New Jersey.

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Now Is Your Time! The African-American Struggle for Freedom written by Walter Dean Myers 1992 Awardee

Patrol: An American Soldier in Vietnam written by Walter Dean Myers 2003 Awardee

FEATURE

?A Bold Peace? screening- May 5

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On May 5th in New York City, a screening of the new documentary film “A Bold Peace,” about Costa Rica’s 68 years of living without a military was shown as a part of the Workers United Film Festival. Featuring interviews with President Luis G. Solis, Dr. Oscar Arias, Christiana Figueres, Mariano Figueres, Gloria Bejarano de Calderon, Victor Ramirez, Father Pablo Richard, Arun Gandhi (grandson of Mahatma Gandhi), and many others.

A film 4 years in the making, involving a world-wide search for archival footage and the close cooperation of the Centro Costarricense de Produccion Cinematografica (Ministry of Culture and Youth) in San Jose, Costa Rica.

This film was made possible in part by the JAPA Disarmament Fund.

Workers United Film Festival

?A Bold Peace? Documentary

Since 1953, the Jane Addams Children’s Book Award annually acknowledges books published in the U.S. during the previous year. Books commended by the Award address themes of topics that engage children in thinking about peace, justice, world community and/or equality of the sexes and all races. The books also must meet conventional standards of literacy and artistic excellence.

A national committee chooses winners and honor books for younger and older children.

Click here to read more about the 2016 Awards.



© 2016 Jane Addams Peace Association

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