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Jane Addams Peace Association News

‘We need diverse books,’ they said. And now a group’s dream is coming to fruition.

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This week marks an impressive new milestone for We Need Diverse Books. Oh, the group’s chief executive and president, has edited and published WNDB’s first anthology: “Flying Lessons and Other Stories,” published by Crown Books for Young Readers. The book, aimed at readers between ages 8 and 12, features 10 stories by a who’s-who of contemporary YA literature, including Kwame Alexander, Jacqueline Woodson and Matt de la Pea. The anthology also includes the winning entry of the 2015 WNDB short-story contest, by debut author Kelly J. Baptist. All of the stories, except one by the late Walter Dean Myers, are new, and all of the authors have donated any profit from the sale of “Flying Lessons” to WNDB.

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Each Kindness written by Jacqueline Woodson 2013 Awardee

From the Notebooks of Melanin Sun written by Jacqueline Woodson 1996 Awardee

I Hadn’t Meant to Tell You This written by Jacqueline Woodson 1995 Awardee

Crossing Bok Chitto: told in written form by nationally recognized Choctaw storyteller, Tim Tingle 2007 Awardee

Now Is Your Time! The African-American Struggle for Freedom written by Walter Dean Myers 1992 Awardee

Patrol: An American Soldier in Vietnam written by Walter Dean Myers 2003 Awardee


21 Picture Books Even Adults Need To Read

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'Freedom in Congo Square’ by Carole Boston Weatherford and R. Gregory Christie

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'Razia’s Ray of Hope: One Girl’s Dream of an Education’ by Elizabeth Suneby

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'This Is the Rope: A Story From the Great Migration’ by Jacqueline Woodson

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Birmingham, 1963 by Carole Boston Weatherford 2008 Awardee

The Book Itch: Freedom, Truth & Harlem’s Greatest Bookstore by Vaunda Micheaux Nelson, illustrated by R. Gregory Christie 2016 Awardee

Razia’s Ray of Hope: One Girl’s Dream of an Education written by Elizabeth Suneby 2014 Awardee

Each Kindness written by Jacqueline Woodson 2013 Awardee

From the Notebooks of Melanin Sun written by Jacqueline Woodson 1996 Awardee

I Hadn’t Meant to Tell You This written by Jacqueline Woodson 1995 Awardee


Remembering the Great War through the Frederick Lee Lectures in Madison

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The Madison Historical Society will present the Frederick Lee Lectures at the First Congregational Church of Madison beginning in January. The three-part lecture series, now in its 10th year, will focus on stories from the Great War.

Winner of the prestigious Children’s Book Guild Award for nonfiction literature, author Ann Bausum will tell the story of Sergeant Stubby at the second lecture on Feb. 12. Stubby, a short brindle bull terrier mutt, served with the 102nd Infantry of the American Expeditionary Forces and was officially a decorated hero of World War I.

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Marching to the Mountaintop: How Poverty, Labor Fights and Civil Rights Set the Stage for Martin Luther King Jr’s Final Hours, written by Ann Bausum 2013 Awardee

With Courage and Cloth: Winning the Fight for a Woman’s Right to Vote, by Ann Bausum 2005 Awardee


Author Patricia Polacco’s good luck story

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Patricia Polacco was in her 40s when she took a trip to New York City, bankrolled by her mother, to try to sell her first children’s book. By day, she would meet with publishers. By night, she and her mother would walk to the stables in Central Park, touch the horses and even collect their manure - a Russian custom for good luck.

And in “Thank You, Mr. Falker,” she writes a tribute to the teacher who identified her learning disabilities, finally teaching her how to read after years of frustration. Mr. Falker also recognized her artistic talent, something she says she developed in part because the reading was so difficult.

“To learn differently does not equate to being dumb,” she said. “All children are gifted - we don’t open our gifts at exactly the same time. When some young people just can’t do it, they feel like failures.”

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Mrs. Katz and Tush written by Patricia Polacco 1993 Awardee


Nigerian writers compete with other African counterparts for literature prize

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Etisalat Prize for Literature is a pan-African prize that celebrates debut African writers of published book-length fiction. The winner of the 2016 Etisalat Prize for Literature will be announced in March 2017.

The judging panel includes Nigerian novelist and poet, Helon Habila (Chair), South African writer/activist Elinor Sisulu and Ivorian writer and Africa39 laureate Edwige Rene Dro.

Elinor Sisulu is a Zimbabwean-born South Africa writer and human rights activist. She is the author of the award-winning children’s book The Day Gogo Went to Vote.

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The Day Gogo Went to Vote written by Elinor Batezat Sisulu 1997 Awardee


The Archive Project - Louise Erdrich

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In this episode of The Archive Project, Louise Erdrich reflects on 16 years of owning her bookstore, Birchbark Books & Native Arts, including its rocky start, how it gained a foothold in the community. She goes on to discuss the differences in bookstore culture around the world, five reasons why independent bookstores have survived despite the odds, … and concludes her lecture with the poem she wrote that lives on the stone steps of the vegetable garden outside of her bookstore.

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The Birchbark House written by Louise Erdrich 2000 Awardee


EPISODE 35 - REVOLUTION BY DEBORAH WILES

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The Book Club for Kids is a podcast where young readers meet to talk about a book. The show includes a celebrity reading from the book. Plus, the author joins us to answer your questions.

We take a trip to Mississippi in the summer of 1964 - Freedom Summer. The second in writer Deborah Wiles’ 1960’s trilogy. “Revolution” is discussed by a trio of George Washington Middle Schoolers at the neighborhood bookstore Hooray for Books! in Alexandria, Virginia. Wiles talks about writing fiction from the facts of history.

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Revolution by Deborah Wiles 2015 Awardee


Edwidge Danticat To Offer Special Poem Dedication At Earthquake Vigil

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The City of Miami, Little Haiti Cultural Complex (LHCC) will be hosting a vigil on Thursday, January 12, 2017 to commemorate the seventh anniversary of the earthquake that devastated Haiti in 2010.

The dedication ceremony will feature a special dedicated poem, written and read by Edwidge Danticat, an award-winning novelist of Haitian descent.

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Mama’s Nightingale: A Story of Immigration and Separation written by Edwidge Danticat 2016 Awardee


Writers Resist: Hundreds to attend pre-inauguration protests

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On Sunday, Jan. 15, hundreds of writers and artists will gather at more than 50 events across the country and abroad - on the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s birthday - to “re-inaugurate” democracy, in their words.

Co-sponsored by PEN America, the gathering will feature authors reading from past and present works that address democratic ideals and freedom of expression.

Authors who will attend Writers Resist events on Jan. 15 include, from top left, Alexander Chee, Michael Cunningham, Rita Dove, Jeffrey Eugenides, Masha Gessen, Mary Karr, Colum McCann, Rick Moody, Beth Nguyen, Robert Pinsky, Francine Prose, Andrew Solomon, Art Spiegelman, Cheryl Strayed and Jacqueline Woodson.

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Each Kindness written by Jacqueline Woodson 2013 Awardee

From the Notebooks of Melanin Sun written by Jacqueline Woodson 1996 Awardee

I Hadn’t Meant to Tell You This written by Jacqueline Woodson 1995 Awardee


Library: Authors coming to speak at libraries

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Carole Boston Weatherford and her son, Jeffery Boston Weatherford, will talk about their recent joint project, the children’s book “You Can Fly: The Tuskegee Airmen,” on April, 9 at 3 p.m. at a location to be announced. Weatherford, a professor of English at Fayetteville State University, won the 2016 Boston Globe/Horn Book Honor Spirit of the Civil Rights Movement for nonfiction for her book “Voice of Freedom: Fannie Lou Hamer.” In November, “You Can Fly: The Tuskegee Airmen” was short-listed for the New York Public Library 100 Books for Reading and Sharing. For the three weeks preceding the April 9 program, illustrations from the book, which were rendered by her son, will be on display at Headquarters Library.

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Birmingham, 1963 by Carole Boston Weatherford 2008 Awardee


Library System Announces Programs Celebrating Black History

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Somerset County Library System of New Jersey’s Hillsborough Library branch
Hillsborough Elementary School’s first grade students, led by art teacher Laurel Suk, will be displaying their Story Quilt projects during the month of February. The creations are inspired by African American painter/writer Faith Ringgold.

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Aunt Harriet’s Underground Railroad in the Sky written by Faith Ringgold 1993 Awardee

Since 1953, the Jane Addams Children’s Book Award annually acknowledges books published in the U.S. during the previous year. Books commended by the Award address themes of topics that engage children in thinking about peace, justice, world community and/or equality of the sexes and all races. The books also must meet conventional standards of literacy and artistic excellence.

A national committee chooses winners and honor books for younger and older children.

Read more about the 2016 Awards.

We are honored and heartened by the outpouring of support from the generous friends of the Jane Addams Children’s Book Award. Thanks to one and all for responding to our end of year appeal. Onward to a new year of reading and discussion!


10 Children’s Books That Celebrate Our Diverse World

Mama’s Nightingale: A Story of Immigration and Separation, by Edwidge Danticat with illustrations by Leslie Staub
A little girl, Saya, listens with deep longing to the taped stories her mother, held in an immigration detention center, sends to her. In the midst of her sadness, Saya finds a way to advocate for her mother.

Inside Out and Back Again, by Thanhha Lai
In a decades-old story as fresh as today’s headlines, 10-year-old H flees the Vietnam War with her mother and brothers by boat, landing first in a tent city in Guam and eventually being connected to refugee sponsors in Alabama.

Bud, Not Buddy, by Christopher Paul Curtis
A boy sets out to find his father, meeting many perils and adventures along the way.

Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry, by Mildred D. Taylor
A story of a black family living in Mississippi in the 1930s, as they work to stay strong in the face of poverty, illness, and racists attacks. As circumstances chip at the protection provided by a loving family, 9-year-old protagonist Cassie Logan comes to a deeper understanding of injustice and why owning land is so important to her father.

Just a Minute: A Trickster Tale and Counting Book, by Yuyi Morales
This is a lushly illustrated tale of a wily grandmother who takes on death itself - that will also teach you to count in both English and Spanish.

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Elijah of Buxton by Christopher Paul Curtis 2008 Awardee

The Watsons Go to Birmingham - 1963 by Christopher Paul Curtis 1996 Awardee

Inside Out & Back Again by Thanhha Lai 2012 Awardee

Mama’s Nightingale: A Story of Immigration and Separation written by Edwidge Danticat, illustrated by Leslie Staub 2016 Awardee

The Well written by Mildred D. Taylor 1996 Awardee

Let the Circle Be Unbroken written by Mildred D. Taylor 1982 Awardee

Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry written by Mildred D. Taylor 1977 Awardee

Song of the Trees written by Mildred D. Taylor 1976 Awardee

Harvesting Hope: The Story of Cesar Chavez, written by Kathleen Krull, illustrated by Yuyi Morales 2004 Awardee


Marilyn Sachs, influential SF author and political activist, dies

Ms. Sachs was the author of 40 books spanning 42 years, with her first book (“Amy Moves In”) published in 1964 and her final work (“First Impression”) in 2006.

Ms. Sachs was known for tackling serious topics - such as depression, divorce, body image and bullying - long before such matters were common fodder for authors of young adult novels. She often said that she turned to public libraries, and to the reading and writing of fiction, as an escape from bullying.

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The Big Book for Peace edited by Ann Durell and Marilyn Sachs 1991 Awardee

A Pocket Full of Seeds written by Marilyn Sachs 1974 Awardee


Simcoe author named to Order of Canada

Simcoe author Deborah Ellis is among the latest recipients of the Order of Canada. Ellis is being honoured for her “acclaimed work as a young adult author and for her philanthropic support of many humanitarian causes,” said a media release. Her much-lauded book, The Breadwinner, is recommended reading for students in Canada, the U.S. and Europe.

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The Heaven Shop, by Deborah Ellis 2005 Awardee

The Breadwinner Trilogy, three books by Deborah Ellis 2004 Awardee

Parvana’s Journey written by Deborah Ellis 2003 Awardee


Author And Storyteller Tim Tingle To Receive 2017 Festival Of Words Author Award

Tim Tingle (Choctaw) will receive the Tulsa Library Trust’s “Festival of Words Writers Award” March 4, 2017, 10:30 a.m., at Hardesty Regional Library’s Connor’s Cove, 8316 E. 93rd St. His award presentation will be followed by a book signing and a day of educational American Indian family events from 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m.

His first children’s book, Crossing Bok Chitto, earned more than 20 state and national awards, including Best Children’s Book from the American Library Association. It also was named an Editor’s Choice by the New York Times Books Review.

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Crossing Bok Chitto: told in written form by nationally recognized Choctaw storyteller, Tim Tingle 2007 Awardee


Massachusetts Book Award Winners

The Mass Books are awarded to significant works of fiction, nonfiction, poetry and children’s/young adult literature published by commonwealth residents or about Massachusetts subjects.

Sherborn resident Susan Lynn Meyer was also honored. Her book, “New Shoes,” was designated a 2016 Must Read in the picture book category.

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New Shoes by Susan Lynn Meyer 2016 Awardee


The best books of 2016, according to 2 best-selling authors

Jeffrey Brown recently sat down with best-selling authors Jacqueline Woodson and Daniel Pink at popular Washington, D.C., bookstore Politics and Prose to discuss their picks.

“Ghost” by Jason Reynolds, which is considered a - quote, unquote - “middle-grade book,” but it’s for anyone who has ever had a family, ever loved running, ever felt outside of a place.

Ta-Nehisi Coates’ “Black Panther.” He was the first black superhero in 1966. T'Challa comes from a fictional place in Africa and is this amazing superhero. It’s about a lot of stuff that we’re talking about now. It’s about race. It’s about power. It’s about just trying to change the world.

“You Can’t Touch My Hair and Other Things I Still Have to Explain” by Phoebe Robinson. I didn’t think this got the attention that it deserved to get. And people don’t know about it. And it’s a book about race. It’s a book about what it means to grow up female in this country and female and black.

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Each Kindness written by Jacqueline Woodson, illustrated by E.B. Lewis 2013 Awardee

From the Notebooks of Melanin Sun by Jacqueline Woodson 1996 Awardee

I Hadn’t Meant to Tell You This by Jacqueline Woodson 1995 Awardee


Ebony Elizabeth Thomas picks the Best Books of 2016 for Young Readers

Picturebooks
Preaching to the Chickens: The Story of Young John Lewis (Jabari Asim; illus. E.B. Lewis)
The Princess and the Warrior: A Tale of Two Volcanoes (Duncan Tonatiuh)
Freedom in Congo Square (Carole Boston Weatherford; illus. R. Gregory Christie)
Radiant Child: The Story of Young Artist Jean-Michel Basquiat (Javaka Steptoe)

Middle Grade Fiction
Makoons (Louise Erdrich)
Lion Island: Cuba’s Warrior of Words (Margarita Engle)

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Each Kindness written by Jacqueline Woodson, illustrated by E.B. Lewis 2013 Awardee

Night Boat to Freedom, written by Margot Theis Raven with pictures by E. B. Lewis 2007 Awardee

Silver People: Voices from the Panama Canal by Margarita Engle 2015 Awardee

The Surrender Tree: Poems of Cuba’s Struggle for Freedom, written by Margarita Engle 2009 Awardee

The Birchbark House by Louise Erdrich 2000 Awardee

Separate is Never Equal: Sylvia Mendez and her family’s fight for desegregation, written and illustrated by Duncan Tonatiuh 2015 Awardee

Birmingham, 1963 by Carole Boston Weatherford 2008 Awardee

The Book Itch: Freedom, Truth & Harlem’s Greatest Bookstore by Vaunda Micheaux Nelson, illustrated by R. Gregory Christie 2016 Awardee

Hot Day on Abbott Avenue by Karen English, with collage art of Javaka Steptoe 2005 Awardee


African-American Authors Take 2016 Spotlight

“We Came to America” by Faith Ringgold

Change the traditional history book narrative about America’s less-than-humble beginnings with this children’s book by Faith Ringgold. In a time where immigrants around the world are being shunned, it’s easy to forget that aside from indigenous peoples, the United States of America was built with the blood, sweat, and tears of immigrants and slaves.

Help your child understand their own story with Ringgold’s text, which delves into the many different cultures woven into the American tapestry.

“Another Brooklyn” by Jacqueline Woodson

Woodson carefully captures the growing pains of August and her three friends Sylvia, Angela and Gigi, as they come of age in the Brooklyn of the 1970s and 80s. Switching effortlessly between past and present, Woodson explores how the hurts of our past indelibly shape the future.

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Each Kindness written by Jacqueline Woodson, illustrated by E.B. Lewis 2013 Awardee

From the Notebooks of Melanin Sun by Jacqueline Woodson 1996 Awardee

I Hadn’t Meant to Tell You This by Jacqueline Woodson 1995 Awardee

Aunt Harriet’s Underground Railroad in the Sky by Faith Ringgold 1993 Awardee


We Need a New Kind of Feminist Art

One answer to this is to include women who have been underrecognized in the telling of feminist history. A show that Catherine Morris, the Brooklyn Museum’s Curator of the Sackler Center for Feminism, is working on at the moment, to open in April 2017, will do just that. Titled “We Wanted a Revolution: Black Radical Women 1965?85,” it will examine the way that second-wave feminism coincided with the Civil Rights movement and the Black Power movement, and include the work of artists like Faith Ringgold, who straddled both the Civil Rights and feminist movements. “She was an activist and very engaged with thinking about both Civil Rights and feminism, and how she could integrate the two, because she needed them both.”

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Aunt Harriet’s Underground Railroad in the Sky by Faith Ringgold 1993 Awardee


8-Year-Old Dresses Up As Ruth Bader Ginsburg For School Superhero Day
Because she fights prejudice and injustice.

It’s superhero day at school. Michele has been reading the heck out of “I Dissent: Ruth Bader Ginsburg Makes Her Mark” by Debbie Levy, and decided to dress as Ruth Bader Ginsburg, because she fights prejudice and injustice. Michele gets pretty passionate about unfairness, especially relating to girls and women, so the book’s message really stuck with her,“ said her mother.

The Supreme Court Justice saw the cute image, which went viral on Facebook, and reached out to the family to send a personal note to Michele.

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We Shall Overcome: The Story of a Song written by Debbie Levy and illustrated by Vanessa Brantley-Newton 2014 Awardee


Top 10 family events in Pittsburgh this January

Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures presents Patricia Polacco: January 8

Patricia Polacco has delighted young readers for three decades with tales inspired by her multi-cultural family. Now the author and illustrator will visit the Carnegie Library Lecture Hall as part of the Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures series. During the event, Polacco will reflect on the inspiration behind her 90-plus books, which include such award-winning works as The Keeping Quilt, Babushka’s Doll, The Blessing Cup and My Rotten Redheaded Older Brother.

The Patricia Polacco talk takes place at 2:30 p.m. Tickets cost $11. A book signing on the first floor of Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh will follow. Books will be available for sale before and after the lecture from Mystery Lovers Bookshop.

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Mrs. Katz and Tush by Patricia Polacco 1993 Awardee


Get ready for January with our family events calendar - Austin, TX

Cynthia Levinson reads "The Youngest Marcher.” 2 p.m. Jan. 28.
BookPeople, 603 N. Lamar Blvd.
bookpeople.com

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We’ve Got a Job: The 1963 Birmingham Children’s March written by Cynthia Levinson 2013 Awardee

Since 1953, the Jane Addams Children’s Book Award annually acknowledges books published in the U.S. during the previous year. Books commended by the Award address themes of topics that engage children in thinking about peace, justice, world community and/or equality of the sexes and all races. The books also must meet conventional standards of literacy and artistic excellence.

A national committee chooses winners and honor books for younger and older children.

Click here to read more about the 2016 Awards.

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As 2016 draws to a close, JOIN US in expanding the reach of the excellent books honored by the Jane Addams Children’s Book Award. Your tax-deductible contribution today will:

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National Geographic publishes local author’s 13th book

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Ann Bausum will release her 13th book in January, which dives headlong into prominent Civil Rights Era activist James Meredith’s march across Mississippi in 1966.

Bausum began writing the book in 2012, and finished it after traveling to Mississippi and taking the march route to Jackson. She said the teen-oriented book might help readers understand the complexity surrounding injustices in the 1960s, while drawing connections to the current climate of race-based social injustice in the 21st century.

“If I can hope for anything, it’s that we can come together,” Bausum said. “If looking back at the past makes for a more fair future, I am happy to contribute to that effort.”

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Marching to the Mountaintop: How Poverty, Labor Fights and Civil Rights Set the Stage for Martin Luther King Jr’s Final Hours, written by Ann Bausum 2013 Awardee


Carmen Agra Deedy at ALA Midwinter

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Join storied New York Times Best-selling author, Carmen Agra Deedy, as she presents a spirited defense of free speech and reads from her new book, The Rooster Who Would Not Be Quiet, illustrated by Newbery Honor Award-Winner Eugene Yelchin, published by Scholastic Press.

“The Rooster Who Would Not Be Quiet” Friday, January 20th 2017. 8-9:30pm. Atlanta, GA

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The Yellow Star: The Legend of King Christian X of Denmark written by Carmen Agra Deedy 2001 Awardee


William Low’s Artwork Featured in the USPS’s 2016 Holiday Forever Stamp Collection

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The stamps, which are part of the “Holiday Windows” collection depict winter night scenes for the Christmas and Hanukkah holidays, and will travel on letters and packages to millions of households and businesses throughout the world.

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Henry and the Kite Dragon, by Bruce Edward Hall, with paintings of William Low 2005 Awardee


RADIANT CHILD: FIRST PICTURE BOOK ABOUT MODERN-ARTIST BASQUIAT

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Coretta Scott King Award winner Javaka Steptoe has created the first picture book biography about modern art phenomenon Jean-Michel Basquiat in Radiant Child: The Story of Young Artist Jean-Michel Basquiat.

Inspired by his life and artwork, Steptoe vividly creates both text and bold artwork that echoes Basquiat’s own. In Radiant Child, young readers will be introduced to the powerful message that art doesn’t always have to be neat or clean - and definitely not inside the lines, to be beautiful.

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Hot Day on Abbott Avenue by Karen English, with collage art of Javaka Steptoe 2005 Awardee


Jacqueline Woodson on Her Favorite Show of 2016: ‘black-ish’

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“But 'black-ish’ is for everyone!” I said, not caring that I sounded like somebody’s clich-ridden grandma, not caring that I was now completely off topic from whatever lecture I was supposed to be delivering. Someone had to help these people get woke. “'Black-ish’” is funny,“ I said. "And real. You realize - it’s not just for black people, right?”

And maybe one of the many reasons we love it is because we see ourselves on the show - our multihued, multilayered family mirrored back at us. [This show] … has helped to begin conversations about everything from racial profiling to the power of literature to nepotism and college essays.

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Each Kindness written by Jacqueline Woodson, illustrated by E.B. Lewis 2013 Awardee

From the Notebooks of Melanin Sun by Jacqueline Woodson 1996 Awardee

I Hadn’t Meant to Tell You This by Jacqueline Woodson 1995 Awardee


Some book: Illustrator paints an intimate portrait of E.B. White

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“I was thinking about who would be a great subject and whose life would have depth and breadth and require a lot of research,” said Sweet, speaking from her Rockport home.

A New York Times article about trumpeter swans planted the idea for E.B. White’s “The Trumpet of the Swan” in which a trumpeter swan is born without a voice. Sweet said she picked up “Letters of E.B. White” and knew she’d found her subject.

“Some Writer” features writing, sketches, photos and more. Sweet, a two-time Caldecott winner, is now at work illustrating a book for children’s author Kwame Alexander.

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Brave Girl: Clara and the Shirtwaist Makers’ Strike of 1909, written by Michelle Markel and illustrated by Melissa Sweet 2014 Awardee


Why Debbie Levy’s New Book About Ruth Bader Ginsburg is Called “I Dissent”

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Ms. Levy talked about what dissent is, when it’s important, and how to get along with people even when you’re dissenting.

RBG’s way: disagreeing by offering insight, not invective. Benefit of the doubt, not bashing. Is it any wonder that I think RBG is a great person to introduce to young people in a picture book?

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We Shall Overcome: The Story of a Song written by Debbie Levy and illustrated by Vanessa Brantley-Newton 2014 Awardee

Since 1953, the Jane Addams Children’s Book Award annually acknowledges books published in the U.S. during the previous year. Books commended by the Award address themes of topics that engage children in thinking about peace, justice, world community and/or equality of the sexes and all races. The books also must meet conventional standards of literacy and artistic excellence.

A national committee chooses winners and honor books for younger and older children.

Click here to read more about the 2016 Awards.

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As 2016 draws to a close, JOIN US in expanding the reach of the excellent books honored by the Jane Addams Children’s Book Award. Your contribution today will:

Read More


THE BEST JEWISH CHILDREN’S BOOKS OF 2016

I Dissent! Ruth Bader Ginsburg Makes Her Mark by Debbie Levy uses the idea of respectful, polite, but firm dissent as a framework for talking about the Supreme Court Justice’s childhood and values. The art is cute but slightly forbidding … much like Ginsburg herself.

A Poem for Peter by Andrea Davis Pinkney tells the story of little red-jacketed Peter from the classic children’s book The Snowy Day, along with the story of his creator, Jewish children’s book author Ezra Jack Keats. Pinkney’s writing sings with the jazzy rhythms of performance poetry; when you read it aloud-and you’d better-be ready to scat and swing.

We Will Not Be Silent is another brilliant history book by Russell Friedman that’s not explicitly Jewish but totally is. Russell’s writing is lively and suspenseful; his use of quotes from contemporary sources is masterful. The message that resistance to tyranny is vital, no matter the cost, will resonate with many politically aware kids today.

Science- and history-loving girls will appreciate Radioactive! How Irne Curie and Lise Meitner Revolutionized Science and Changed the World by Winifred Conklin.

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We Shall Overcome: The Story of a Song written by Debbie Levy and illustrated by Vanessa Brantley-Newton 2014 Awardee

Sit-In: How Four Friends Stood Up by Sitting Down by Andrea Davis Pinkney, illustrated by Brian Pinkney 2011 Awardee

Sojourner Truth’s Step-Stomp Stride, by Andrea Davis Pinkney & Brian Pinkney 2010 Awardee

Freedom Walkers, written by Russell Freedman 2007 Awardee

Kids at Work: Lewis Hine and the Crusade Against Child Labor written by Russell Freedman 1995 Awardee

Eleanor Roosevelt: A Life of Discovery written by Russell Freedman 1994 Awardee

Sylvia & Aki by Winifred Conkling 2012 Awardee


Windsor Hill, Beech Hill host authors

Carmen Deedy, a world-renowned author and storyteller, hosted presentations with both second- and third-grade students. Deedy spoke about the writing process with students, shared an unpublished manuscript entitled “This Bites: Letters to the Tooth Fairy”, as well as shared stories with students about her first trip to a library and how she developed a love for reading.

Deedy also recently spent the day at Beech Hill Elementary sharing stories of her childhood with students in second through fifth grade. She read from an upcoming book she’s working on and shared how taking a book from draft to publication can take over 40 revisions

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The Yellow Star: The Legend of King Christian X of Denmark written by Carmen Agra Deedy 2001 Awardee


Q&A with artist Faith Ringgold, creator of Tar Beach

Artist Faith Ringgold presented the 2016 Jane Fortune Outstanding Women Visiting Artist Lecture on Nov. 30 at IUPUI. This lecture series aims to highlight prominent women who are impacting the field of art.

Faith Ringgold: “I think as an artist I had to be an activist, because there were so many places that were shutting me out as a woman and as an African-American. These fields are very often closed to people of color and women. I had to open up some things so I could get the work out there and get it seen.”

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Aunt Harriet’s Underground Railroad in the Sky by Faith Ringgold 1993 Awardee


Mitali Perkins’ New YA Novel, ‘You Bring The Distant Near,’ Looks And Sounds Amazing - EXCLUSIVE COVER REVEAL

You Bring the Distant Near captures the immigrant experience for one Indian-American family with humor and heart. Told in alternating teen voices across three generations, this elegant YA novel explores sisterhood, first loves, friendship, and the inheritance of culture - for better or worse.

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Rickshaw Girl by Mitali Perkins, illustrations by Jamie Hogan 2008 Awardee


See the stunning cover for Blue Sky White Stars by Kadir Nelson and Sarvinder Naberhaus

Pairing resonant paintings with sparse, thought-provoking verses, Blue Sky White Stars celebrates the country’s history and icons, spanning from the Statue of Liberty to civil rights marchers to space travel.

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The Village That Vanished written by Ann Grifalconi and illustrated by Kadir Nelson 2003 Awardee

Heart and Soul: The Story of America and African Americans written and illustrated by Kadir Nelson 2012 Awardee


A Literary Legend: a talk with author Katherine Paterson about The Great Gilly Hopkins

Paterson: “I really discovered a long time ago that if you want people to respond deeply to your work, then you have to go deeply inside yourself and expose parts of yourself that you ordinarily would rather not. You can’t write a book that people are going to respond to on a deep level unless you’re willing to do that.”

Kathy Bates to Paterson: “Especially in these terrible times, it is important to realize that one right minded, compassionate, and determined person can make a difference by shaping the destiny of a child.”

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The Same Stuff as Stars by Katherine Paterson 2003 Awardee

The Great Gilly Hopkins by Katherine Paterson 1979 Awardee

Since 1953, the Jane Addams Children’s Book Award annually acknowledges books published in the U.S. during the previous year. Books commended by the Award address themes of topics that engage children in thinking about peace, justice, world community and/or equality of the sexes and all races. The books also must meet conventional standards of literacy and artistic excellence.

A national committee chooses winners and honor books for younger and older children.

Read more about the 2016 Awards.

image

As 2016 draws to a close, JOIN US in expanding the reach of the excellent books honored by the Jane Addams Children’s Book Award. Your contribution today will:

Read More


‘Freedom of Speech is Absolutely Imperative’: Faith Ringgold on her early art, activism at the Museum of Modern Art

“I wanted people to understand it’s not just poor people breaking into stores and stuff like that,” RINGGOLD said of the riot she depicted. “What is happening is people are trying to maintain their position in life, either rightly or wrongly, trying to keep one group down. One group is trying to keep the other from advancing. Another group is trying to maintain their position. Another group is trying to get out of the way. So you’ve got all of these things that are happening. Everybody is involved, nobody gets away without a struggle. There is a struggle.” She paused and spoke more slowly. “Freedom is not free. Everybody is going to have to pay a price to be free.”

Ringgold’s newest children’s book-her 18th-concerns another hot-button issue: immigration. It’s titled We Came to America, and tells the story of all types of people finding a home in this country. “I think it might have been the most difficult one [I’ve made] because so many people came here,” Ringgold said. “I didn’t want to leave anybody out. Now, today, we’ve got so many different ethnicities of children, and I wanted them all to be able to see themselves.”

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Aunt Harriet’s Underground Railroad in the Sky by Faith Ringgold 1993 Awardee


Creating Gilly Hopkins

“I think hope is probably the strongest theme of both the book and the film,” David Paterson said. “Kids in the foster care system have a level of hopelessness. Hope is one of the most powerful components of human beings. Hope can be a powerful tool in getting through some elements of life… We hope we do a good job representing those on the frontlines of foster care. The film acknowledges all the hard work of foster families everywhere.”

For Katherine, the story is something near to her heart and her own experiences. “Especially for kids who feel they are disposable, I would hope by seeing the film they know they aren’t,” Katherine said. “You can’t choose what happened to you, but you can choose what you do with it.”

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The Same Stuff as Stars by Katherine Paterson 2003 Awardee

The Great Gilly Hopkins by Katherine Paterson 1979 Awardee


First Book and Penguin Random House Partner to Bring Brand New Books and Red Mittens to Kids in Need Through Red Mitten Campaign

First Book, the nonprofit social enterprise that has distributed more than 150 million books to kids in need, are partnering to bring 5,000 brand-new books and pairs of warm red mittens to children in low-income communities this winter.

The Red Mitten Campaign is supported by award-winning children’s author Andrea Davis Pinkney and the Ezra Jack Keats Foundation. The Campaign will donate up to 5,000 brand-new books and 5,000 pairs of brand-new red mittens for every Ezra Jack Keats title sold in participating book stores through the end of December.

“Pairing the beloved Peter ? one of the first widely-read children’s books featuring an African-American child ? with a pair of warm mittens for a child in need is a gift that meets some of the most acute needs in the communities we serve. It supports our mission to promote diversity in children’s literature, and it provides warmth in the winter months,” said Kyle Zimmer, president and CEO of First Book.

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Sit-In: How Four Friends Stood Up by Sitting Down by Andrea Davis Pinkney, illustrated by Brian Pinkney 2011 Awardee

Sojourner Truth’s Step-Stomp Stride, by Andrea Davis Pinkney & Brian Pinkney 2010 Awardee


Pam Muoz Ryan: Getting Readers to Turn the Page

Pam Muoz Ryan, the celebrated and critically acclaimed author of Esperanza Rising, The Dreamer, and Riding Freedom, among many others, joins us in the studio today with her editor, Tracy Mack, to talk about her writing process, the genesis of her latest New York Times bestselling, Newbery Honor novel, Echo, and why so many of her novels contain themes of social justice.

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Esperanza Rising written by Pam Muoz Ryan 2001 Awardee


Dearborn elementary school students earn writing awards at 2016 Young Authors’ Festival

Four students from Dearborn elementary schools received awards for their writing at the University of Michigan-Dearborn Mardigian Library’s fourth annual Young Authors’ Festival.

At the festival, young writers learned tips about what it takes to be an author from Newbery Medal-winning author and special guest speaker, Christopher Paul Curtis, a Flint native and U of M-Flint graduate. He is the author of the highly acclaimed books, “Bud Not Buddy,” “Elijah of Buxton,” and “The Watsons Go to Birmingham - 1963.”

Curtis told the eager audience to be observant and listen, and encouraged them to use what they see and hear in their everyday lives in their stories. He gave an example about how writing can be a collaborative process through the challenges he faced when writing a book from a girl’s perspective. He got a lot of advice from the girls and women in his life to help him shape his character’s personality and voice.

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The Watsons Go to Birmingham - 1963 by Christopher Paul Curtis 1996 Awardee


A Dallas author’s Hillary Clinton book is up for a big literary prize

Dallas author Karen Blumenthal has been nominated for one of the most prestigious honors given to a work of young-adult nonfiction.

Her biography Hillary Rodham Clinton: A Woman Living History is a finalist for the Young Adult Library Services Association Nonfiction Award.

“It was a huge surprise, given the subject matter,” Blumenthal said in an email. “I am also thrilled and very grateful because I think Hillary Clinton’s story is a meaningful one regardless of the election outcome.”

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Let Me Play: The Story of Title IX, the Law that Changed the Future of Girls in America by Karen Blumenthal 2006 Awardee

Since 1953, the Jane Addams Children’s Book Award annually acknowledges books published in the U.S. during the previous year. Books commended by the Award address themes of topics that engage children in thinking about peace, justice, world community and/or equality of the sexes and all races. The books also must meet conventional standards of literacy and artistic excellence.

A national committee chooses winners and honor books for younger and older children.

Click here to read more about the 2016 Awards.


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